Author Topic: 4 or 6 element practice?  (Read 3110 times)

Offline Spiny Norman

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4 or 6 element practice?
« on: January 21, 2012, 02:13:23 am »
I'd be interested to hear from anyone with experience of these.
Thanks.

Spiny

Offline Hanzze

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Re: 4 or 6 element practice?
« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2012, 07:12:53 am »
What do you mean by 4 element practice and by 6 element practice? *smile*

Offline Lobster

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Re: 4 or 6 element practice?
« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2012, 02:13:30 am »
Elemental practice I find very balancing and complete

You can find the elements applied about half way down here
http://tmxxine.com/s4/faqs.html

They represent four main qualities of being
with one or two added representing aspects of mindfulness

I was taught them as 'body mudra', which has to be done in person
and as a meditation.

You can use this as a basis:



When you have a strip of coloured shapes
place them in front of you.
Sit and breath comfortably
Now we can use each coloured shape
as a focus.
Bring relaxed attention to the yellow
square and bring the awareness to the body.
Then bring attentive awareness to the blue circle
become aware of any emotional arisings.
Then attentive to the red triangle
become aware of any issues to do with identity.
Then attentive to the white crescent
bring the attention to the mind.
On the Gold now finally contemplate
any understanding of Spirit you may have.
It is a good idea to keep a journal
of what happens.
This is a very transformative meditation

Offline Spiny Norman

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Re: 4 or 6 element practice?
« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2012, 03:12:55 am »
What do you mean by 4 element practice and by 6 element practice? *smile*

Traditionally in Buddhism the 4 elements are earth, wind, fire and water - these comprise form ( rupa ). 

In some suttas the 2 additional elements of space and consciousness are added.

Spiny

Offline Hanzze

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Re: 4 or 6 element practice?
« Reply #4 on: January 22, 2012, 07:39:08 am »
What do you mean by 4 element practice and by 6 element practice? *smile*


Traditionally in Buddhism the 4 elements are earth, wind, fire and water - these comprise form ( rupa ). 

In some suttas the 2 additional elements of space and consciousness are added.

Spiny


Yes, but I would like to ask what do you mean with practicing 4 or 6 element. I guess it is general known, that the observing of the elements is part of vipassana practice (mindfulness on the body). So did you mean in which way one or the other observe it? Or do you like to talk about the view of elements general (4, 6 or even only 1...or non)? Or do you like to speak of more esoteric or new age methods like Lobster introduced to? *smile*

This is maybe useful for the further discussion.

Quote

This is an illustration of the six Elements. Four human figures paying respect to the king represent the Four Great Elements: Earth, Water, Fire and Air. (Or of Solidity, Cohesion, Temperature and Mobility, which are the marks of all matter.) The fifth element, Space, surrounds the others. The king is a representation of the sixth element, Viññnanadhātu, the Consciousness-element. The king (or the mind) is shown as superior to and in control of the other four (Earth, Water, Fire, Air) elements which represent corporeality. Space should be regarded as beyond, and distinct from, the mind (nāma) and body (rūpa) elements, although some schools of thought regard space as an aspect of mind. According to this latter approach, only two elements are present - mind and body. However, there are also the three elements of rūpadhātu, arūpadhātu, and nirodhadhātu. rūpadhātu is the element that has form and is composed of corporeal matter. Arūpadhātu is formless and abstract, while nirodhadhātu is the cessation of nāma (mind) and rūpa (body) and is experienced as voidness. The space element should be regarded as nirodhadhātu, and not as rūpa or nāma. (The last three dhātus or elements, of form, formlessness and cessation, are not abstract ideas but relate to certain experiences won through the practice of calming, concentrating and enriching the mind with wisdom. In the same way, the first four great elements may also be experienced trough mindfulness of the body.)

from "Teaching Dhamma by pictures form Ven. Buddhadasa Bhikkhu

 

Offline Lobster

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Re: 4 or 6 element practice?
« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2012, 05:47:44 pm »
The elements are carried by the Buddha here



if you wish to construct your own as a source of study
You can place them on a wall

Offline ground

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Re: 4 or 6 element practice?
« Reply #6 on: January 22, 2012, 11:54:19 pm »
What do you mean by 4 element practice and by 6 element practice? *smile*

Traditionally in Buddhism the 4 elements are earth, wind, fire and water - these comprise form ( rupa ). 

In some suttas the 2 additional elements of space and consciousness are added.

Spiny

Ah ... then I practice 5 occasionally :)

Offline francis

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Re: 4 or 6 element practice?
« Reply #7 on: January 23, 2012, 02:32:52 am »
The Six Element practice by Bodhipaksa

I think there are also some good instructions in the Shurangama Sutra.

With metta :)
"Enlightenment, for a wave in the ocean, is the moment the wave realises it is water." - Thich Nhat Hanh

Offline Spiny Norman

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Re: 4 or 6 element practice?
« Reply #8 on: January 23, 2012, 05:46:23 am »
The Six Element practice by Bodhipaksa



Thanks.  That's more or less how I've been approaching it - the commonality of internal and external elements is I think quite significant.

Spiny

Offline Lobster

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Re: 4 or 6 element practice?
« Reply #9 on: January 23, 2012, 11:56:50 pm »

Offline Hanzze

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Re: 4 or 6 element practice?
« Reply #10 on: January 24, 2012, 03:10:36 am »
Can you explain us a little about this mystic symbols and how to practice. There is just one kind of practice that comes into my mind, but for sure very important, very important for developing later needed discernment. 



*smile*

Offline Lobster

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Re: 4 or 6 element practice?
« Reply #11 on: January 24, 2012, 10:59:21 pm »

Offline Hanzze

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Re: 4 or 6 element practice?
« Reply #12 on: January 24, 2012, 11:44:35 pm »
great link *smile* regrettably I have no access. Karma *smile*
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Offline francis

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Re: 4 or 6 element practice?
« Reply #13 on: January 25, 2012, 02:05:09 am »
Can you explain us a little about this mystic symbols and how to practice. There is just one kind of practice that comes into my mind, but for sure very important, very important for developing later needed discernment. 



*smile*




Hi Hanzee,

The six elements is a visualisation practice.

http://www.kamalashila.co.uk/blog-7/


:)
"Enlightenment, for a wave in the ocean, is the moment the wave realises it is water." - Thich Nhat Hanh

Offline Spiny Norman

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Re: 4 or 6 element practice?
« Reply #14 on: January 25, 2012, 03:48:49 am »
The six elements is a visualisation practice.

http://www.kamalashila.co.uk/blog-7/



I think that's a Mahayana approach.  In the sutta commentaries there is advice to use a small amount of the actual element for reflection, eg a bowl of water.

Spiny

 


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