Author Topic: Amida Buddha & Tibetan Buddhism  (Read 104 times)

Offline Dharma Flower

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Amida Buddha & Tibetan Buddhism
« on: October 26, 2017, 11:23:46 am »
Deity yoga is the central practice of Tibetan Buddhism, with the term “deity” referring to enlightened beings. Amida Buddha is one of many such meditation deities utilized for the sake of realizing one’s Buddha-nature:

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The purpose of Deity yoga is to bring the meditator to the realization that the yidam or meditation deity and the practitioner are in essence the same, that they are non-dual (advaya). According to John Powers. “Deity yoga is a technique for becoming progressively more familiar with the thoughts and deeds of a buddha, until the state of buddhahood is actualized through repeated practice.”[4]

According to Gyatrul Rinpoche, the point of this practice is to “understand your buddha nature, which is the very essence of your being” and is “intrinsically present” in all beings.[5] The fact that the deity is a reflection of qualities already inherent in the practitioner is what makes this practice different than mere deluded or wishful thinking.[6]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deity_yoga

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Deity yoga, then, is a practice which helps us identify with a particular fully enlightened being or Buddha in order to realize our innate Buddha nature. Using visualisation, chanting, mantra recitation, and meditation, we focus upon a particular deity and in many practices visualize ourselves as that deity, non-dual with them…

The deity mirrors to us our true enlightened nature. As our practice deepens, and we reach an ever closer identification/relationship with the deity, delusion and obscuration are revealed as illusory, and the energies of deluded mind transform into their non-dual, naturally enlightened qualities.

His Holiness the Dalai Lama has said, “In brief, the body of a Buddha is attained through meditating on it.”
http://www.rigdzindharma.org/deity-yoga-practice.html


Like in Zen Buddhism, the purpose of Pure Land practice in deity yoga is to realize Amida Buddha as our True Self, rather than an external being:

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Thine own consciousness, shining, void, and inseparable from the Great Body of Radiance, hath no birth, nor death, and is the Immutable Light-Buddha Amitabha.
http://redzambala.com/tibetan-book-of-the-dead/tibetan-book-of-the-dead-part-2.html


This is the Dalai Lama blessing a statue of Amida Buddha:
« Last Edit: October 26, 2017, 11:59:06 am by Dharma Flower »

Offline Pixie

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Re: Amida Buddha & Tibetan Buddhism
« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2017, 11:59:16 am »
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Students of Tibetan Buddhism do foundational practices such as Ngondro to begin with and then one's teacher may suggest a personal Yidam practice.

Tibetan Buddhism can't be practised correctly without personal input between the student and a teacher (guru).

Its better to go to a  Tibetan Buddhist centre for information and guidance rather than reading what can sometimes be misinformation and speculation on the internet, from people who haven't even been to a Vajrayana centre, let alone practiced it with a teacher.

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« Last Edit: October 26, 2017, 12:10:01 pm by Pixie »
May all beings have happiness and the causes of happiness.
May they all be free from suffering and the causes of suffering.
May they never be deprived of true happiness devoid of any suffering.
May they abide in great impartiality, free from attachment to loved ones and aversion to others.

Offline Dharma Flower

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Re: Amida Buddha & Tibetan Buddhism
« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2017, 01:00:41 pm »
Its better to go to a  Tibetan Buddhist centre for information and guidance...


I already practice Pure Land practice in the Jodo Shinshu tradition, with the intent of realizing Amida Buddha as our true nature, like they do in deity yoga.

I recommend the book Buddha of Infinite Light by D. T. Suzuki, who was raised in both the Rinzai Zen and Jodo Shinshu traditions of Japanese Buddhism.

This is a paper on the myokonin, those unlettered Japanese saints who, through simple practice of the Nembutsu, realize non-duality between Amida and oneself:
http://threewheels.org.uk/reflections/talks/daisetz-t-suzuki-and-saichi-asahara-a-shin-buddhist-poet/
« Last Edit: October 27, 2017, 12:10:32 am by Dharma Flower »

 


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