Author Topic: Book recommendations on mindfulness  (Read 559 times)

Offline Arkena

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Book recommendations on mindfulness
« on: July 20, 2017, 10:57:33 pm »
So i am not just a beginner in mindfulness , i realise the following to give you an idea of where i am at in order to recommend appropriate books for my level

I realise:

Emptiness...

A good grasp of non self...this is mainly via eckhart tolle's writings...

How mind is part of the non self but that as part of "me" it must be accepted and looked on kindfully or else inner conflict and non harmony would arise...

Deep non judgmental acceptance of all aspects of "myself" is essential for inner harmony and peace

Also i am not necessarily a buddhist but follow the buddha as well as eckhart tolle, mooji etc, i believe there are many masters. So secular books not connected with buddhism would interest me as well.

So what mindfulness books/other meditation techniques would you recommend to deepen and help me learn?

As a side note i dont think western books on mindfulness penetrate deeply enough into understanding harmony with the non self and dont seem to realise that this is at the core of mindfulness and being. Id like to be proved wrong and ignorant lol

 :pray:

Offline ground

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Re: Book recommendations on mindfulness
« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2017, 11:41:44 pm »
you should care for consistency. If eckhart tolle resonates with you you should see what he says about mindfulness. your view and your practises should be consistent.

Offline The Artis Magistra

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Re: Book recommendations on mindfulness
« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2017, 01:09:13 am »
Why, ground? Just curious.

Offline VisuddhiRaptor

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Re: Book recommendations on mindfulness
« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2017, 01:29:04 am »
Emptiness...A good grasp of non self...Deep non judgmental acceptance... is essential for inner harmony and peace

These things written above are 'wisdom' or 'right view' rather than 'mindfulness'.

'Mindfulness' means 'to remember' or 'to bring to & keep in mind'. There are many wisdoms that can be brought to mind.

'Mindfulness' is 'to remember' to not grasp things as self & 'to remember' to not be judgmental.

A clear book on mindfulness is MN 117:

Quote
One is mindful to abandon wrong view & to enter & remain in right view: This is one's right mindfulness.

One is mindful to abandon wrong resolve & to enter & remain in right resolve: This is one's right mindfulness.

One is mindful to abandon wrong speech & to enter & remain in right speech: This is one's right mindfulness.

One is mindful to abandon wrong action & to enter & remain in right action: This is one's right mindfulness.

One is mindful to abandon wrong livelihood & to enter & remain in right livelihood: This is one's right mindfulness.

MN 117  http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.117.than.html


 :namaste:

Offline The Artis Magistra

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Re: Book recommendations on mindfulness
« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2017, 02:07:28 am »
So i am not just a beginner in mindfulness , i realise the following to give you an idea of where i am at in order to recommend appropriate books for my level

I realise:

Emptiness...

A good grasp of non self...this is mainly via eckhart tolle's writings...

How mind is part of the non self but that as part of "me" it must be accepted and looked on kindfully or else inner conflict and non harmony would arise...

Deep non judgmental acceptance of all aspects of "myself" is essential for inner harmony and peace

Also i am not necessarily a buddhist but follow the buddha as well as eckhart tolle, mooji etc, i believe there are many masters. So secular books not connected with buddhism would interest me as well.

So what mindfulness books/other meditation techniques would you recommend to deepen and help me learn?

As a side note i dont think western books on mindfulness penetrate deeply enough into understanding harmony with the non self and dont seem to realise that this is at the core of mindfulness and being. Id like to be proved wrong and ignorant lol

 :pray:

Can you explain to me, casually, as I do not mean to question this idea with any sort of hostility but I am mainly curious about how people tend to think or what they inagine, what you have in mind when you say "Not Necessarily a Buddhist". What in your idea is a Buddhist and not a Buddhist and why are you in your view excluded from being a Buddhist? How do you differ from what you imagine a Buddhist is exclusively? The reason I am asking this everywhere is to try to figure out ways or strategies to break down what might be inhibiting people from Buddhismor considering themselves Buddhist or keeping them from the Dharma by hearing their ideas of exclusion or what makes them hesitate or second guess it.

Offline Arkena

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Re: Book recommendations on mindfulness
« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2017, 02:49:24 am »
Quote
Can you explain to me, casually, as I do not mean to question this idea with any sort of hostility but I am mainly curious about how people tend to think or what they inagine, what you have in mind when you say "Not Necessarily a Buddhist". What in your idea is a Buddhist and not a Buddhist and why are you in your view excluded from being a Buddhist? How do you differ from what you imagine a Buddhist is exclusively? The reason I am asking this everywhere is to try to figure out ways or strategies to break down what might be inhibiting people from Buddhismor considering themselves Buddhist or keeping them from the Dharma by hearing their ideas of exclusion or what makes them hesitate or second guess it.

There are two reasons I would not call myself a buddhist...

1) I find it is too restrictive a label, if it was a label that implied I am open to learn the wisdom of the universe wherever It is to be found eg: Eckhart tolle, a passage of the Tao Te ching etc I would be a Buddhist. I find the term Buddhist implies I exclusively follow the wisdom of the buddha and look to him as the sole source of great wisdom, it is just too restrictive a title for me. I find not taking the label Buddhist allows me to disagree with certain teachings of buddhism and to pick ones I feel resonate more with the truth. eg: the concept of having a soul/true self (christian teaching) which many buddhists disagree with. So in summary I feel calling myself a follower of Buddha rather than a Buddhist is a question of freedom to choose what teachings resonate with me. Althought for practical purposes I am what most people would call a Buddhist but woulld not use that term myself.

2)growing up as a catholic I am still undoing there mindless conditioning where religion requires faith and not intelligence...intelligence can help you perceive the truth...faith only perceives whatever you've been told, so I find whenever I use a religious title it brings out this past conditioning in me, which i am working on undoing.

Can we get back to a book recommendation now LOL  ;D

Offline The Artis Magistra

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Re: Book recommendations on mindfulness
« Reply #6 on: July 21, 2017, 02:59:37 am »
Great answer. So Buddhism appearing overly restrictive and fundamentalist and exclusive has caused you to avoid the title.

I consider myself Catholic, Buddhist, Muslim, Taoist, etc, freely. I guess what I must be overall is a liar, since many would say a Buddhist can not be a Catholic or a Muslim or a Taoist and each can not be like the other or say the same things. So instead of going to heaven for being good by all standards, I go to hell in each for doing too many impossible things.

Offline The Artis Magistra

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Re: Book recommendations on mindfulness
« Reply #7 on: July 21, 2017, 03:02:05 am »
I bring this up so that you might be happier, but if you don't want to be everything, you can be whatever you like best. I just happen to like being baffling by promoting unity and benevolence.

Offline ground

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Re: Book recommendations on mindfulness
« Reply #8 on: July 21, 2017, 03:47:29 am »
...
Can we get back to a book recommendation now LOL  ;D
Obviously you don't understand. Every book about mindfulness is necessarily one from the perspective of a specific basic system of view. It simply makes no sense to combine Eckhart tolle's view with e.g. buddhist mindfulness. Stick to Eckhart tolle's mindfulness if he teaches one and if he teaches none then forget mindfulness practice.
« Last Edit: July 21, 2017, 03:49:31 am by ground »

Offline Solodris

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Re: Book recommendations on mindfulness
« Reply #9 on: July 21, 2017, 04:44:37 am »
Althought for practical purposes I am what most people would call a Buddhist but woulld not use that term myself.

Perhaps you would call yourself a practicing Buddhist then?

Can we get back to a book recommendation now LOL  ;D

It seems, in order to touch mindfulness, one must first understand meditation, when meditation have been established in the mind, when meditation have been understood, then one can move on to practice mindfulness.

I might recommend the following books:

How to Meditate - Kathleen McDonald
Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind - Shunryu Suzuki
Always Present - Jigme Phuntsok
You Are Here - Thich Nhat Hanh

They should be considered as a foundation of remembrance, that would translate into mindfulness.

If anyone has anything to add, feel free to do so.

Offline Arkena

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Re: Book recommendations on mindfulness
« Reply #10 on: July 21, 2017, 06:28:38 am »
...
Can we get back to a book recommendation now LOL  ;D
Obviously you don't understand. Every book about mindfulness is necessarily one from the perspective of a specific basic system of view. It simply makes no sense to combine Eckhart tolle's view with e.g. buddhist mindfulness. Stick to Eckhart tolle's mindfulness if he teaches one and if he teaches none then forget mindfulness practice.

This view sums up why I would not bear a restrictive label that says i only follow one teacher. The attitude found theirin speaks for itself. It is a sect like view that says you can only follow one system at a time as reconcilling them is impossible/too hard/non constructive...in the pursuit of the truth. It makes assumptions not based on experience or on a failure to find compatible teachings from different sources.

I should learn to take comments less personally i think that is something we can agree on lol  :pray:

Offline The Artis Magistra

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Re: Book recommendations on mindfulness
« Reply #11 on: July 21, 2017, 09:57:54 am »
...
Can we get back to a book recommendation now LOL  ;D
Obviously you don't understand. Every book about mindfulness is necessarily one from the perspective of a specific basic system of view. It simply makes no sense to combine Eckhart tolle's view with e.g. buddhist mindfulness. Stick to Eckhart tolle's mindfulness if he teaches one and if he teaches none then forget mindfulness practice.

This view sums up why I would not bear a restrictive label that says i only follow one teacher. The attitude found theirin speaks for itself. It is a sect like view that says you can only follow one system at a time as reconcilling them is impossible/too hard/non constructive...in the pursuit of the truth. It makes assumptions not based on experience or on a failure to find compatible teachings from different sources.

I should learn to take comments less personally i think that is something we can agree on lol  :pray:

No offense intended to anyone, but you shouldn't let "*ssholes" dictate your life based on their "farts".

Seriously, you'll be much happier when you come to terms with these control-freaks not even being Buddhist in the first place.

They will always pop up, its their job, its built into them to bark like dogs at everyone who approaches anything.

Literally, you can go to practically any place and these same "*ssholes" will show up making their loud farts, that is, blowing hot air out of their one orifice, since they haven't learned to use any other. Of course it stinks, of course it creates heat, it can even start a fire if someone lights a match.

I invite you to Everything. Its not a fun life to just be huddled in a corner because dogs have been allowed to run free. You're the human being, this is your life, it is not the dogs life, the dogs nature is to bark, its just how they communicate.

What the dogs are trying to say, these "*ssholes" or anuses, whatever you prefer, are trying to say to you, is that they love you and want you to be their master.

They are not saying they want to be free, they are not saying they want you to go away (they are very stupid, I mean who has heard of an (*sshole with a brain?), they are trying to say, in their own mentally deficient way, that they want to love you and submit to you and be your slave. Now of course, we don't want to enslave these slavish people, so really its our rejection that is disappointing them so much and making them feel bad, because their appeal is heartfelt "master, master, own me, tell me what is right" is the translation of their sounds. Our answer is the sagely "no, no, but go (^#$(# yourselves!". We are so incredibly rude to them.

So what we should probably do in response to these gross things, is be merciful, but certainly not to misunderstand them. All they want is someone to control every waking move of their life, that is what they are begging for, and that is the only thing that will satisfy them, but we can't grant them that, so they act out of control.

So don't let a barking dog keep you out of the temple. The barking dogs are everywhere. You can be a Buddhist, you can be all those things, you can be the things that are most scary too, you can be a Muslim, a Jew, a Nazi. The good sort of Nazi. There are lots of Nazi dogs, lots of Nazi barkers, they don't own Nazism. I am using extreme examples and saying extreme things for a very particular reason.

So I invite you to Everything. I invite you to ALL HUMAN WORK, ALL HUMAN HISTORY, the Universal, the Cosmic, and take from this garden of delights every good fruit, but DO NOT EAT FROM ONE TREE. Eat from ALL the TREES except the "very specific tree over there".

I am a Buddhist. I think you are too. You and I are other things as well. Doesn't it make you feel nice to be things? Doesn't it make you feel nice to realize dogs and *ssholes are just making sounds? They really would like to be like us, but they can't be, they are not like you or me. The "very specific tree" is covered in their territorial piss.

Offline philboyd

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Re: Book recommendations on mindfulness
« Reply #12 on: July 21, 2017, 05:06:13 pm »
Minding Closely,  The Four Applications Of Mindfulness -
B. Alan Wallace
Peace

Offline ground

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Re: Book recommendations on mindfulness
« Reply #13 on: July 21, 2017, 11:04:31 pm »
...
Can we get back to a book recommendation now LOL  ;D
Obviously you don't understand. Every book about mindfulness is necessarily one from the perspective of a specific basic system of view. It simply makes no sense to combine Eckhart tolle's view with e.g. buddhist mindfulness. Stick to Eckhart tolle's mindfulness if he teaches one and if he teaches none then forget mindfulness practice.

This view sums up why I would not bear a restrictive label that says i only follow one teacher. The attitude found theirin speaks for itself. It is a sect like view that says you can only follow one system at a time as reconcilling them is impossible/too hard/non constructive...in the pursuit of the truth. It makes assumptions not based on experience or on a failure to find compatible teachings from different sources.

I should learn to take comments less personally i think that is something we can agree on lol  :pray:
Obviously you still don't understand. It is not about following a teacher or a sect but it is about consistency of view and practice.
If e.g. someone teaches that there is no suffering and this view resonates with you it doesn't make sense to practice being mindful of suffering.
I do not know what Eckhart tolle's view is and I am not interested in views of such self-proclaimed 'enlightened' ones but there is a diversity of mindfulnesses depending on the diversity of objects one can be mindful of.
What is it that you want to be mindful of? If you know then why do you need a book? Just be mindful of what you want to be mindful of.

If you are axious about holding a view because you are anxious about it being someone else's view which may seduce you to sectarianism then just be mindful of views arising in your mind and as soon as any view arises drop it. This then is mindfulness of 'no view'.
« Last Edit: July 21, 2017, 11:19:42 pm by ground »

Offline Arkena

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Re: Book recommendations on mindfulness
« Reply #14 on: July 22, 2017, 04:39:19 am »
No Ground you dont understand how following non consistent views can help widen your perspective when pursued correctly...if  pursued incorrectly they lead to misunderstanding...this is certainly not a practice for beginners who are just learning one view/model...This is why modern psychologists learn different psychological models as they emphasise and understand things differently and some views may be better to understand certain situations. Why do you think psychologists and scientists learn different theories of the same topic if all this led to was confusion?

Eckhart tolle's teachings on the now has had tremendous implications for my understanding of mindfulness and being...again that is my experience...you are relying on a theory as to how different views interact when pursued by one person.

and as usual you like to point out where people are wrong because they dont subscribe to your views. Perhaps expressing your view without judging others as wrong/not understanding would lead to more harmony...besides...you cannot tell someone they they are wrong...you can only help them realise it for themselves...otherwise it just becomes a butting of heads.

Lets find harmony in this.  :pray:

 


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