Author Topic: Mindfulness  (Read 7601 times)

Offline Hanzze

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Re: Mindfulness
« Reply #15 on: July 14, 2013, 08:04:47 am »
Be mindful and you will see that your emotions are changing all the time. So nothing to worry about.

Offline songhill

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Re: Mindfulness
« Reply #16 on: July 14, 2013, 12:35:40 pm »

Offline Hanzze

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Re: Mindfulness
« Reply #17 on: July 14, 2013, 10:17:35 pm »
Mindfulness in Early Buddhism: http://www.watflorida.org/documents/Mindfulness-in-Early-Buddhism_Kuan.pdf  :suit:


Be careful and mindful, if you contribute stuff associated with SEAsian institutions like "Wat Florida" as well as when "Oxford Buddists studies" is displayed. They usually do not care much about mindfulness, keeping wholesome deeds in mind.

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« Last Edit: July 14, 2013, 10:21:16 pm by Hanzze »

Offline Anirac Gregbah

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Re: Mindfulness
« Reply #18 on: March 25, 2014, 06:07:11 am »
I quite enjoyed this article on mindfulness and it's way to heal and soothe. However, can someone explain the part about making room for the emotion? It said make space for the emotion, like putting an angry bull inside a large field. It sounds great, but I didn't quite understand the concept, how it is done in practice? What is it you actually do/think/etc to achieve this? Clear your mind of all other thoughts? Erase other feelings? Focus on only that emotion, imagine it in pictures? Would greatly appreciate an explanation :) 

Offline Ron-the-Elder

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Re: Mindfulness
« Reply #19 on: March 25, 2014, 11:16:25 am »
Think of mindfulness as "simply being aware".  The goal is not to do anything about it , but to simply observe and come to an understanding of the true nature of reality as events arise.  You are not expected to do anything, but to adjust your behavior in light of this new "correct" understanding as it evolves before your eyes.  It may be that you want to react, or even feel an obligation, but that is not the goal.  The goal is discovery of facts as they develop in front or your eyes.

Example:  Walking along a hedge row you see pigs flying up in the air, squealing and screaming.  You cannot see how they were thrown into the air, because the hedge row blocks your view of all the interactions which cause the pigs to fly up in the air.  As you come to the end of the hedge row you observe that the pigs are in a long line crossing the railroad tracks and as the try to cross the tracks in their line train engines come along and collide with them, throwing them up into the air.  You cannot do anything to help the pigs, because there is a chain-link fence between you and the pig path.  You walk further and your path crosses the tracks.  The same tracks which rails carried the train engines, which hit the pigs.  You have a choice:  You can walk onto the train track and get thrown into the air like the pigs, or you can stop and time your crossing to when the trains are not coming.  "That is mindfulness."  You have observed actions and consequences.  You might arrive at a point where this experience about which you became aware  could affect you, or you might not.  If such a circumstance may affect you, then you can "mindfully" or call it "intentionally" formulate a possible course of action in light of the potential consequences.

Another form of mindfulness is called "reflection".  We can reflect on past experience as with the flying pigs incident and formulate a possible course of action, or we can choose to ignore what we learned and take our chances.  Reflection allows us not only to lean from the mistakes or successes of others, but also from our own mistakes and successes, so that when similar circumstances arise again, we can take advantage of our experiences if we were mindful at the time of the occurrences.

Simple concept, really.
What Makes an Elder? :
A head of gray hairs doesn't mean one's an elder. Advanced in years, one's called an old fool.
But one in whom there is truth, restraint, rectitude, gentleness,self-control, he's called an elder, his impurities disgorged, enlightened.
-Dhammpada, 19, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

Offline Dharmakara

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Re: Mindfulness
« Reply #20 on: March 25, 2014, 11:24:34 am »
Quote
The effect of this is to create a space around the emotion. The more mindful you are, the greater the space. The more space there is, the more freedom. Freedom from what? Freedom from the grip of the negative emotion, thought or belief. There is a Zen proverb: What is the best way to control a mad bull? Answer: Place it in a very large field. If there is plenty of space, then the mad bull, or your anxiety, hurt, trauma or depression cannot harm you.

In other words, what is the best way to deal with an emotion? Do you calmly examine the emotion from outside of the emotion (where you become the "observer") or do you attempt to control it, to "bottle" it in? On the other hand, there's something even worse, like attempting to deny that the emotion is even there to begin with?

When it comes to that mad bull, you shouldn't try to hide it a way with the fine china and nick-knacks like a bull in a china shop, no sooner than you should confine that mad bull, forcing it to run through the narrow and winding streets of your mind.



Offline visham

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Re: Mindfulness
« Reply #21 on: May 30, 2014, 02:13:15 am »

Offline Awakened_Angel

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Re: Mindfulness
« Reply #22 on: June 12, 2014, 11:42:37 pm »
Mindfulness in Early Buddhism: http://www.watflorida.org/documents/Mindfulness-in-Early-Buddhism_Kuan.pdf  :suit:


it is hard for me to sustain the attention of awareness.  yes, i do feel the changes in emotions.

Offline dennis

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Re: Mindfulness
« Reply #23 on: August 27, 2014, 10:11:02 am »
As I pass through my day thoughts arise unbidden.

Some are created by my task, some arise unrelated
(as far as I can tell) to my present situation but are
created by memories.  Generally most are allowed
to pass without further notice but some are persistent
and require further thought; these, I believe, are the
thoughts related to survival (instincts).

These instinctive thoughts may relate to friend/foe,
mine/yours basic situations but if I act on them with-
out thought and control I'm basically just an animal.

I believe the practice of Mindfulness puts us in tune
with our sub/un-conscious mind and gives us, not only
mindfulness of what arises but a tool to modify our
sub/un-conscious mind.

People who believe there is no "free will" say it's just
a matter of "Garbage in-Garbage out" so I guess I
think it's time to take out the garbage and replace/renew
my mind with more flowers.

Offline ldtibbets

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Re: Mindfulness
« Reply #24 on: February 25, 2015, 04:46:12 pm »
Thank you so much for the articles, the first time I heard of mindfulness was actually from a psychologist and I am practicing every day, I'm only a beginner but with practice I know that it can be a very powerful tool in dealing with life in general. A helpful exercise and page I have found is

www.buddhanet.net/vmed_5.htm
Happy the peaceful live, discarding both victory and defeat.

 


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