Author Topic: Death.  (Read 2436 times)

Offline chrispche

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Death.
« on: October 22, 2015, 12:52:54 am »
I have this terrible fear of death. I suffer from bi-polar disorder and have high anxiety. From a Buddhist point of view I should and do meditate on the subject of death. Actually let's call it ego death. So through the Dharma and meditation. I have been trying to slowly chip away at my ego and fear. I am making some progress, but it's terribly slow. I post this here in the hope of some advice or tips.

Thanks in advance.

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Offline Ron-the-Elder

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Re: Death.
« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2015, 10:05:53 am »
Charnel meditations are a means of desensitizing ourselves with the corruption process experienced by the body.  We must come to the understanding that all of us will experience the same.  However the understanding of the Buddha's teaching regarding impermanence I have found to be most freeing, because it teaches the foolishness of any thought of immortality in this realm of samsara.  There is only one way to eliminate  dukkha and karmic effect, and that is to live one's life in accordance with The Nolbe Eight Fold Path as taught by Buddha in his Four Noble Truths.

This is the path of Freedom, Unbinding and Release from samasara:  nibbana.
What Makes an Elder? :
A head of gray hairs doesn't mean one's an elder. Advanced in years, one's called an old fool.
But one in whom there is truth, restraint, rectitude, gentleness,self-control, he's called an elder, his impurities disgorged, enlightened.
-Dhammpada, 19, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

Offline chrispche

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Re: Death.
« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2015, 01:52:31 pm »
Thanks for that reply.

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Offline question everything

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Re: Death.
« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2015, 03:17:26 am »
This is a decent article :  THE SPIRITUAL NEEDS OF THE DYING:
A BUDDHIST PERSPECTIVE

    Compiled by: Ven. Pende Hawter


  http://www.buddhanet.net/spirit_d.htm

 Always remember you can return  to the breath and the now.
" Better than a thousand useless words is one useful word, hearing which one attains peace."

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/kn/dhp/dhp.08.budd.html

Offline question everything

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Re: Death.
« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2015, 07:17:07 am »
" Better than a thousand useless words is one useful word, hearing which one attains peace."

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/kn/dhp/dhp.08.budd.html

Offline Dharmakara

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Re: Death.
« Reply #5 on: November 06, 2015, 07:42:55 am »

Hi chrispche.

I'm not sure I have anything to add to this discussion, other than to speak from my own experience, having lived with a terminal disease my entire adult life, a disease that could have taken my own life at any point during those years, a disease that in fact has taken the lives of millions of others during those years.

I'm 53 years of age as of now and I certainly don't fear death, in part due to the fact that the Dhamma taught me how to live, where learning how to live goes hand-in-hand with learning how to die --- as QE mentioned above, it comes down to returning to the breath, living in the here-and-now, where you learn to count your blessings in the present moment.

BuddhaNet actually has a good collection of various resources on the topic of death and dying, so you might want to check out the sitemap listing:

http://www.buddhanet.net/r_booksd.htm

Offline dunmatter

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Re: Death.
« Reply #6 on: November 09, 2015, 09:50:46 pm »
you need not hold onto anything, nor death, fantasy about it. its as if you hit a wall of thoughts and battle mode kicks in, habit, no need to struggle remain aware, let it settle, the water comes clear.

Offline dunmatter

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Re: Death.
« Reply #7 on: November 09, 2015, 09:54:18 pm »
its only fear it arises, its onlky death that arises too, but its only temporary... hold onto it like a stone in your head and heart and you become amognst the waves of the ocean splashing around not knowing what to do.

Offline dunmatter

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Re: Death.
« Reply #8 on: November 09, 2015, 10:00:42 pm »
and the root of your anxiety and depression lies inside your very own spiral of thought, which sticks to you like glue because you get effected by the mental habit every day must of scared the bejeezus outta you, dont worry, it shall pass, its just a cloud in the sky

Offline mistachris

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Re: Death.
« Reply #9 on: February 25, 2016, 06:52:55 pm »
My solution is to wrap myself in the refuge of the darhma.

It has helped me with so much.

Trust its wisdom.

Have faith in its ability concerning the relief of suffering.

But dont forsake Medical attention.

Bipolar is something that needs to be treated.

I wish you well my friend.


Offline ECS

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Re: Death.
« Reply #10 on: July 25, 2016, 07:05:53 pm »
I have this terrible fear of death. I suffer from bi-polar disorder and have high anxiety. From a Buddhist point of view I should and do meditate on the subject of death. Actually let's call it ego death. So through the Dharma and meditation. I have been trying to slowly chip away at my ego and fear. I am making some progress, but it's terribly slow. I post this here in the hope of some advice or tips.

Thanks in advance.

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I had same problem fearing death since aged 10 .....now at 47 years old , I still fearing death but this feeling is very minor compared to when I was teenager ......I realized I am not the body , I realized I am the emotion , I am desire / I am fear / i am love / I am anger etc and i realized nothing is owned by me ... "my" daughter / parent / car / physical body is never belong or connected to me ....and I fear death because fear itself is me ..........I fear death because the desire to stay alive is me ... I fear death because of my greed to stay in comfort zone .... I fear death because as I am the worry ... worry of un-known..........and Buddhism is the natural process that I will realize my existence and as one awaken to Buddhism , one realize that one is constantly in a natural process travelling into the original state before existence , the state of nothingness ....

Offline stillpointdancer

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Re: Death.
« Reply #11 on: July 26, 2016, 03:41:17 am »
I have this terrible fear of death. I suffer from bi-polar disorder and have high anxiety. From a Buddhist point of view I should and do meditate on the subject of death. Actually let's call it ego death. So through the Dharma and meditation. I have been trying to slowly chip away at my ego and fear. I am making some progress, but it's terribly slow. I post this here in the hope of some advice or tips.

Thanks in advance.

Sent from my SM-G903F using Tapatalk
For me, the time to meditate on death is when you need to remind yourself how little time we have to get to enlightenment, rather than come to terms with the fear of death. Or if we mistakenly think that we are going to live forever. It's very powerful, at the right time. It may be that, rather than face death, you need to let go of death. If you see life as an illusion, holding you back from seeing into the reality of existence, then so too is death an illusion.

There are many powerful, wonderful meditations to try, maybe where you visualize the whole of space and time as one. Where we all have lived and died many times- the past, present and future have happened together. A place where we find that our lives have just been an illusion, and that we finally find joy in knowing that we were never separate beings, lonely and afraid of death. We just thought we were.

I hope this helps. Meditation isn't the same as therapy, though. It can and will help with problems in your life, but, for me, it's main job is to let you see through illusions, to get insights into the nature of reality. So maybe it can at least help with those aspects of your problems that are common to all of us not yet enlightened.
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

Offline Solodris

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Re: Death.
« Reply #12 on: August 09, 2016, 06:20:51 pm »
Dukkha is the inherent nature of life, it is how by evolution we adapt to better suit ourselves to our environment. As a modern human being, we have evolved to the stage where we fear the personification of death. Remind you this is Mara talking. Anatta teaches us how everything is inter-connected as by realizing the environment is the source for all our sensations, perceptions, feelings and thoughts as an informational feeding ground, not the nexus point that is the human brain. Anicca defines the impermanent nature of how one being, when the nexus point is no longer functioning, will like a lightning bolt go to the next most identical nexus point that will be our next body as a being in this eon of samsara.

If life is impermanent, then so is death. The Buddha taught us that everything that arises, ceases. And from the cessation, nirvana/parinirvana, comes, and there is sukha, only for dukkha to arise again. Conscious life is inevitable this way.

Offline stillpointdancer

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Re: Death.
« Reply #13 on: August 10, 2016, 02:52:14 am »
If life is impermanent, then so is death. The Buddha taught us that everything that arises, ceases. And from the cessation, nirvana/parinirvana, comes, and there is sukha, only for dukkha to arise again. Conscious life is inevitable this way.

Not really. Death is a process at the end of a particular life, not a description of a state of being after life. Death can't be impermanent since it's not a 'thing' to have impermanence or permanence attached to. Wherever there is life there will be death, but you can't say that wherever there is a lack of life there will be life. 'Being dead' is an idea of those of us still alive, so is not a 'thing'.

We may also be the only conscious beings ever to come into existence in this or any other universe, and once we are gone, that's it. It may be our tragedy that we are the only things to ever feel separate from Nirvana.
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

Offline Daud

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Re: Death.
« Reply #14 on: August 23, 2016, 11:11:06 pm »
Hey friend.

I myself, not too long ago discovered i greatly feared growing old and dying. I found that meditation on the death process, while practicing with my  Yidam sadhana helped me to discover, on an unconscious level that there was nothing to be feared. You have died a million billion times before and will die a million billion times again.

Mahamudra meditation also helped me to slow my thoughts and concerns of the future and banish insecurities. I would reccomend practicing Mahamudra and the death process/ dissoultion of winds.
"Things derive their being from mutual dependance and are nothing in themselves" - Nagarjuna

 


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