Author Topic: Not identifying with a thought  (Read 1855 times)

Offline Dairy Lama

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Re: Not identifying with a thought
« Reply #15 on: January 03, 2019, 03:56:19 am »
I brought this quandry to my meditation instructor.  He shrugged, smiled and said "it's just a thought".

Yes, and you don't have to believe everything you think.   :teehee:
"My religion is very simple - my religion is ice-cream"

Offline stevie

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Re: Not identifying with a thought
« Reply #16 on: June 10, 2019, 06:10:45 am »
...
However i have found the not identifying psychological tool can be misapplied or misinterpreted and can becomes a rejection of ourselves which is not the point at all.

I was looking at my body and thinking dont identify with the body but really this becomes a rejection of a part of us. Result was i felt ungrounded and unable to connect to my body as i would in mindfulness. This was clearly a harmful thing i did psychologically.
...

Dear Arkena,

talking from within my sphere of experience, what you're describing is the negation that usually takes place in the sphere of conceptuality.
Conceptuality is bound to deceptive imputed dichotomies of is vs isn't, does vs doesn't in the context of taking as truths what is merely dependent imputation, i.e. these conceptual imputations make themselves felt as if being true. So identifications like 'I am this' or 'This is mine' are felt as if being true and accordingly the conceptual negations of such identifications -  'I am not this' or  'This is not mine' - again can make themselves felt as if being true.

The deception however is merely that sentiment of 'being true' in both cases. So identification isn't a problem if the deceptive sentiment of truth is removed. The same applies to the opposite: negation of identification isn't a problem if the deceptive sentiment of truth is removed.
So one may ask: But  if in both cases, identification and its negation, it is only the involved sentiment of truth that is problematic but not identification or its negation as such then why do we bother about identification at all? And the answer is: Simply because conceptuality is trapped in illusory dichotomies and concomitant deceptive truths. If the nature of conceptuality is realized identification or its negation have lost their conventional meaning since they are revealed as being empty of truth.

Taking your example of the body as an exercise I would try the following: to absolutely negate 'I am this body' or 'This body is mine' without slipping to the opposite sentiment/intuition ('I am not this body' or 'This body is not mine') as it usually happens in the manner of a flip-flop in the sphere of conceptuality. In the sphere of conceptuality this exercise may appear to be absurd because either 'is' or 'isn't' is conventionally 'true' but one should observe the concomitant sentiments/intuitions in this case. Can one succeed to absolutely negate without slipping to the opposite sentiment/intuition? And if one succeeds what remains experientially after the absolute mere negation/removal of what has been absolutely negated?
If one cannot avoid slipping to the opposite sentiment/intuition initially then the exercise could be to keep trying applying mindfulness/introspection in terms of this deceptive sentiment/intuition of 'truth'. But of course one should not let oneself slip into the the misinterpretation/misapplication you have mentioned because that would be detrimental and not conducive at all.

 :anjali:
།བྷྲཱུཾ་བི་ཤྭ་བི་ཤུད་དྷེ།

Offline RossB

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Re: Not identifying with a thought
« Reply #17 on: June 15, 2019, 08:47:54 pm »
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« Last Edit: July 08, 2019, 12:11:49 pm by RossB »

 


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