Author Topic: Question about PÄ«ti  (Read 1916 times)

overmyhead

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Question about PÄ«ti
« on: January 15, 2010, 08:38:22 pm »
During my meditation, I have been exploring the causal factors involved with pÄ«ti.  Specifically, the feeling of ecstasy that flows through my body, I'm not sure exactly what pÄ«ti refers to, but I think it is at least this in part.  I have found that, lately, the feeling keeps coming back when I am not meditating.  It feels nice, but it is distracting, and I would prefer if it would only occur in meditation.  Does anyone else experience this outside of meditation?  Also ... am having trouble discerning the causal relationships, so if you have any insight into that, feel free to speak up.   :cheesy:

TMingyur

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Re: Question about PÄ«ti
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2010, 11:09:43 pm »
I have no insights into your piti :teehee:

Offline cooran

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Re: Question about PÄ«ti
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2010, 11:15:37 pm »
Hello overmyhead, all,

pīti
rapture, enthusiasm (rendered also by joy, happiness); interest it is one of the mental factors or concomitants (cetasika) and belongs to the group of mental formations (sankhāra-kkhandha). As, in sutta texts, it is often linked in a compound word. with 'gladness' (pāmojja) or 'happiness' (sukha), some Western translations have wrongly taken it as a synonym of these two terms. Pīti, however, is not a feeling or a sensation, and hence does not belong to the feeling-group (vedanā-kkhandha), but may be described psychologically as 'joyful interest'. As such it may be associated with wholesome as well as with unwholesome and neutral states of consciousness.

A high degree of rapture is characteristic of certain stages in meditative concentration, in insight practice (vipassanā) as well as in the first two absorptions (jhāna, q.v.). In the latter it appears as one of the factors of absorption (jhānanga; s. jhāna) and is strongest in the 2nd absorption.
Five degrees of intensity in meditative rapture are described in Vis.M. IV. 94ff.
It is one of the factors of enlightenment (bojjhanga, q.v.).
http://www.palikanon.com/english/wtb/n_r/piiti.htm

If you are a member of Dhammastudygroup you will have access to their Files section.  Under "Useful Posts" there are many discussions of pÄ«ti - what it is and what it isn't.
If you aren't a member, if might be worth joining to have access to the Files section:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dhammastudygroup/

metta
cooran
---The trouble is that you think you have time---
---It's not what happens to you in life that is important ~ it's what you do with it ---

overmyhead

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Re: Question about PÄ«ti
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2010, 11:11:59 pm »
Thanks cooran.  I'm surprised that it is not considered a feeling.  If I understand correctly, pÄ«ti would be the joyful interest associated with the feeling that permeates the body, but not the feeling itself?

Offline cooran

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Re: Question about PÄ«ti
« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2010, 12:17:32 am »

Hello overmyhead, all,

See what you think of this article:

Contemplation of Feeling - The Discourse-Grouping on the Feelings
translated from the Pali, with an Introduction by Nyanaponika Thera
Contents
Introduction
The Place of Feeling in Buddhist Psychology
The Discourse-grouping on the Feelings (Vedana-Samyutta)
Miscellaneous Texts
Notes
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/nyanaponika/wheel303.html

with metta
Chris
---The trouble is that you think you have time---
---It's not what happens to you in life that is important ~ it's what you do with it ---

overmyhead

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Re: Question about PÄ«ti
« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2010, 01:03:16 pm »
Thank you for the source - I will read it when I have time.

Offline ABC

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Re: Question about PÄ«ti
« Reply #6 on: January 25, 2010, 01:12:44 am »
Also ... am having trouble discerning the causal relationships, so if you have any insight into that, feel free to speak up.   :cheesy:
Hi

All I can offer is the grossness of piti generally corresponds to the grossness of meditation. For example, if concentration is gross due to strong suppression or if meditation is based on external objects such as a guru or deity then piti may be gross because it is arising from suppression of the hindrances rather than from the calming & dissolving of the subtle mental formations in the breath, mind & body.

If concentration is more refined, that is, more open, gentle & spaciousness, then the piti that will occur will be more subtle &, most importantly, manageable.

Concentration that is not based in letting go will bring sticky results.

Kind regards

ABC  


« Last Edit: January 25, 2010, 01:16:28 am by ABC »
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