Author Topic: Recommendations for Meditation Retreats in Thailand  (Read 93 times)

Offline derekf208

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Recommendations for Meditation Retreats in Thailand
« on: August 11, 2017, 04:19:25 am »
I've done 2 10-Day Goenka(Vippasssana) Retreats here in the U.S. and would like to take my practice further and also explore monastic life a little bit.  So on that note, I would prefer to do a meditation course in a monastic setting, preferably in the Theravada tradition. 

If anyone has any advice and/or recommendations to a good teacher in Thailand, I would appreciate it.  Thanks

Offline Samana Johann

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Re: Recommendations for Meditation Retreats in Thailand
« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2017, 04:34:17 am »
Sadhu and Mudita, Nyom Derek.

It's maybe good to ask on Dhammawheel, as my person could not really recognize many familar, with what Nyom likes to do and in which frame, here.
But if not just fast "holiday" retreat, and since one mets his best always if not really focusing "that I need, such must it look like" but by simply doing merits all the way, my person would say best to simply make an exploring culture and religion journey with a possible good considered "visiting the monks and do service and merits" overhead. In this way, coming out of a giver position at first place, one is more sure to come in touch with the Dhamma as even under the best teachers in the most desired circumstances. It's a different way, but a solid and conform. Whould not seek out for western used places and comfortable places (e.g. the popular). The technique for rightly earned renounciation times itself you might already have learned.
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Offline The Artis Magistra

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Re: Recommendations for Meditation Retreats in Thailand
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2017, 02:11:52 pm »
I've done 2 10-Day Goenka(Vippasssana) Retreats here in the U.S. and would like to take my practice further and also explore monastic life a little bit.  So on that note, I would prefer to do a meditation course in a monastic setting, preferably in the Theravada tradition. 

If anyone has any advice and/or recommendations to a good teacher in Thailand, I would appreciate it.  Thanks

Hi! You may like to imitate the monk's life and rules as much as possible without making any official obligations or vows. See what areas are too hard to live up to or seem unreasonable to you or causing troubles or obstructions, and then don't worry about it too much or study why that might be and if there is any work around or solution or lack of understanding or just skip it. I live much like a monk at times, Samana also is full blown doing it as far as I'm aware. My activities are also reminiscent in some ways of Jain people or Mahavira and even other religions too.

There are many benefits to adopting the best and most useful features of anything, the most admirable features of anything. It also looks sexy and feels good. There is a great deal of deep pleasure in the way that Samana eats for example, a pleasure that is deeper than the usual transient sort, a pleasure of Sukkha or whatever, when you are hungry but not greedy, receive food generously even the poorest sort, and eat it gratefully for example as a person who is grateful for everything or anything, a desperate sort of person. Then eating tiny frogs is not an insult, but like a treasure.

When the Buddha was said to have practiced unnecessary extremes of asceticism and damage to his body, simply rice became like an amazing and fulfilling and much appreciated thing. I've experienced this gratefulness as well, but it requires a good heart, appreciation, and being rid of many of the things which make people act like jerks and monsters and ingrates towards everything, towards even big things.

The habits that are evil, once they grow, extend fully to everything, where a person would scoff at big treasures because they never appreciated even a single grain of rice or the work of an insect.

Buddhism is about attaining the Great Joy, to go beyond and above the Transient which is painful and unsatisfactory. Its very simple and beautiful and you should use it. Do not become obsessed with "Masters" and "Gurus" and any inhibiting forces or "holders" or "withholders" of the Dharma or True Way. They are nothing but people just like you, animals too.

Its your job to take the resources made available in your experience and think about how to best put them to use, and more importantly, put them then to the best of uses always as much as you can to live a good and happy life and see where it might take you!


 


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