Author Topic: Buddhist meditation techniques  (Read 5493 times)

Offline francis

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Re: Buddhist meditation techniques
« Reply #15 on: March 22, 2012, 11:38:46 pm »
I have found Ajahn Brahm’s The Basic Method of Meditation extremely useful.






with metta :)
"Enlightenment, for a wave in the ocean, is the moment the wave realises it is water." - Thich Nhat Hanh

Offline Infinity989

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Re: Buddhist meditation techniques
« Reply #16 on: July 24, 2013, 08:06:12 am »
a few links on meditation techniques:



Buddhist Meditation #1:

http://www.freemeditations.com/buddhist_meditation.html

+++

Buddhist Meditation #2:

http://www.freemeditations.com/buddhist_breath_meditation.html


+++


Zen Mountain Monastery Meditation Instructions

http://www.mro.org/zmm/teachings/meditation.php


+++++

Offline JC33

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Re: Buddhist meditation techniques
« Reply #17 on: September 06, 2014, 10:39:04 pm »
I don't know which one is the most popular. I do 500 bows a day which gives me plenty of energy. In the future I would like to practise zazen more, but not yet because of my lingering karma...

AHAHA AHA
HA

AHA

Offline JC33

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Re: Buddhist meditation techniques
« Reply #18 on: September 06, 2014, 10:51:59 pm »
We can talk at us in that way till we believe it. *smile*
Who wants to believe anything?



I once had a conversation with the Gods, which your defiled existence is not worthy to hear, but know this:

The Buddah's way was preproprocecessed between all the existence being natures of the program,

and in every end, it exhibited the form upon world-beings:

Nothingness is true.

Thus, we shut the Buddah's original program down, for it knew the true God of all origin: Nothingness.

In its place we gave you the exact same thing, though you can not understand this how Nothingness can be Everythingness:

Everythingness.

Lord Buddah said:

"To believe is to believe in everything."


Offline Dharmakara

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Re: Buddhist meditation techniques
« Reply #19 on: September 07, 2014, 08:58:32 pm »
Lord Buddah said:

"To believe is to believe in everything."


The Enquirer:

         Fixed in their pet beliefs,
         these divers wranglers bawl --
         "Hold this, and truth is yours";
         "Reject it, and you're lost."

         Thus they content, and dub
         opponents "dolts" and "fools."
         Which of the lot is right,
         when all as experts pose?


The Lord [Buddha]:

         Well, if dissent denotes
         a "fool" and stupid "dolt,"
         then all are fools and dolts,
         --since each has his own view.

         Or, if each rival creed
         proves lore and brains and wit,
         no "dolts" exist, --since all
         alike are on a par.

         I count not that as true
         which those affirm, who call
         each other "fools." --They call
         each other so, because
         each deems his own view "Truth" . . . .

         There's one sole "Truth" (not two).
         to know which bars men's strife.
         But such a motley crowd
         of "truths" have they evolved,
         that anchorites, perforce,
         speak not in full accord. . . .

         Apart from consciousness,
         no diverse truths exist.
         --Mere sophistry declares
         this "true," and that view "false."

         The senses' evidence,
         and works, inspire such scorn
         for others, and such smug
         conviction he is right,
         that all his rivals rank
         as "sorry, brainless fools" . . .

         Whom should the sturdiest
         venture to call a "fool"
         when this invites the like
         retort upon himself? . . . .

         --Leave then dogmatic views
         and their attendant strife . . . .



from a translation of a selection of the Sutta-Nipata
 in E A Burtt, ed., The Teachings of the Compassionate Buddha
(1955)

Offline cosmic_dog_magic

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Re: Buddhist meditation techniques
« Reply #20 on: April 20, 2015, 04:48:36 am »
Mindful Focusing is pretty interesting, it's something I've naturally arrived to from other somatic meditation practices and inquiry into Kleshas.  It's combination of Eugene Gendlin's contemplative practice of focusing, and mindfulness awareness practice that David Rome (studied under Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche) illustrates in the book Your Body Knows the Answer.  I feel fortunate to have this practice elaborated on and grateful to David Rome for providing this material.

It's a right brained oriented way of attending to the sensations in the body, felt senses as they are called, that lie between the conscious and unconscious mind.  It's often this area of sensations that we act from, this area includes all sorts of feelings, such as fear, jealousy, anger, pride, etc.  When we look focus inwards, on the body, within the clear space of present awareness, and listen to these sensations and vibrations, contractions, and retractions, textures, colors, temperatures, movements - we learn that the body is actually quite intelligent, and that we can learn about all the subtle tricks in which we shut down or work against the process that wants to unfold in us, in the situations that we encounter.  How we perpetuate certain harmful behaviors out of aggression or resentment, often times memories of similar situations come up, we see that we carry these traumas into the present, and we learn ways of letting go and making room so to speak.  Like the phrase "clearing your conscience" is very apropo.  When we do this over time we begin to open and learn to soften, sitting practice and being present becomes easier.

Anyways highly suggest the book, I'm still cracking away at the exercises, I know it will be of value to some of you.
metta

edit: gotta get rid of the thetans. lol
watching "going clear" sounds eerily similar.
« Last Edit: April 20, 2015, 07:14:46 am by cosmic_dog_magic »

Offline Boris

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Re: Buddhist meditation techniques
« Reply #21 on: May 14, 2015, 05:35:56 am »
There is an interesting question, I think is appropriate on this tread:
The best meditation technic is the one that the practitioner practices. If you don't stick to it, no technic will work. So you have to give it time.
But at some point the practitioner has to decide if techinc is working for him or not. After all the Buddha himself tried several gurus before he became one himself.
So my question is: How one knows that "for me" this technic is failed and I need to look for something else? Can we share here our "failures" and the experiences that told us "enough is enough" let's move on?
 :om:

Offline Zen_Bookaholic

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Re: Buddhist meditation techniques
« Reply #22 on: August 30, 2015, 12:51:26 pm »
For me, breathing techniques coupled with a more analytical approach has worked well. I typically sit for about fifteen minutes to half an hour in the morning and simply focus on breathing. Nothing fancy. When my mind is calm, I shift my attention to whatever difficult emotions or thoughts seem to be pressing. I try to engage the thoughts/emotions openly, to let them say their piece. I notice that I gain a lot of insight in this method, because I start to see more how my neurotic tendencies play themselves out. Lately the practice has evolved into the aforementioned breathing meditation, and then I spend another ten minutes or so journaling. I approach the journaling the same way as the analytical meditation I mentioned before, but somehow the act of writing things out is more effective than merely turning them over in my mind. Whether it's an "official" meditation method or not, it works for me.

As for meditation techniques that don't work for me, I didn't find visualization all that useful. I could never hold an image of the Buddha, or a candle flame, or anything else for long enough to get any sort of calming effect. I mostly found myself frustrated. Breathing meditation had a more immediate effect for me.

Offline Infinity989

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Re: Buddhist meditation techniques
« Reply #23 on: September 27, 2015, 08:48:59 am »

Zazen Instructions - from Zen Mountain Monastery

https://zmm.mro.org/teachings/meditation-instructions/

Offline Lobster

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Re: Buddhist meditation techniques
« Reply #24 on: January 23, 2016, 02:50:32 am »
As for meditation techniques that don't work for me, I didn't find visualization all that useful. I could never hold an image of the Buddha, or a candle flame, or anything else for long enough to get any sort of calming effect. I mostly found myself frustrated. Breathing meditation had a more immediate effect for me.


Now that mindfulness and yoga as a spiritual path (as oppossed to body culture), moving meditation such as tai chi and mantras for every occasion etc. etc. are available ...

Yippee!  :om:

Meditation is now available as a secular, therapeutic self treatment for many of us. It is like exercise a discipline.

Personally I prefer the simplest techniques at the moment but needs and circumstances change ... adjustment on the path is ongoing ...
http://www.alternet.org/personal-health/how-mindfulness-movement-went-mainstream-and-backlash-came-it

Offline ECS

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Re: Buddhist meditation techniques
« Reply #25 on: July 24, 2016, 09:55:29 pm »
In my current mind , as one created emotion to learn meditation and later into learning various type of meditation will lead into creation of more mind ... as his desire , his love , his greed , his ego , his fear etc will increase as such he will travel longer journey into realizing his nature of existence ... in short , the more he seek and learn to meditate , he will travel longer journey into realizing he is emotion... he is desire not the outcome of the knowledge that he gain .......... so suffering is the nature of this path

Offline stillpointdancer

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Re: Buddhist meditation techniques
« Reply #26 on: July 25, 2016, 03:01:15 am »
So my question is: How one knows that "for me" this technic is failed and I need to look for something else? Can we share here our "failures" and the experiences that told us "enough is enough" let's move on?
 :om:
Good question. I lucked out in that in my youth I experimented with relaxation and 'improvement' tapes (shows how old I am!). I got to know my body as it relaxed, and I listened to improvement messages while feeling as though I was floating on air. Years later when I started experimenting with meditation, it meant that I could explore how to combine relaxation and meditation techniques to best effect.

So I was flexible in my approach to meditation from the start. I developed a couple of basic meditations, such as mindfulness of breathing, and started to see each meditation as a journey. If the journey got rather rocky, I would return to five minutes of, say, mindfulness of breathing, then return to the original meditation.

I read around a lot, so when I got too bored, or felt that my meditation was getting stale, I would try something else. I'm talking about a timescale of years here, rather than weeks or months. There was so much to try that it seemed a waste of time not to experience something that might help me move on.

When I did eventually join a Buddhist group, it meant that I had the confidence to keep developing my own meditation, whilst still working within the main teachings of the group. I got the best of both worlds. For me, vipassana meditation became my main technique, returning to simple mindfulness of breathing and metta meditations as and when I needed them.

Although these have been the mainstay of my practice for the last twenty years, things still arise that I go on to explore, so I think that's my advice. Develop a couple of basic meditations to return to when things get too boring, or stale, or scary, but don't be afraid to move on, and to explore and have fun with different meditations, until you find one that suits your current stage of development.
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

Offline Spiny Norman

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Re: Buddhist meditation techniques
« Reply #27 on: July 25, 2016, 09:29:15 am »
Although these have been the mainstay of my practice for the last twenty years, things still arise that I go on to explore, so I think that's my advice. Develop a couple of basic meditations to return to when things get too boring, or stale, or scary, but don't be afraid to move on, and to explore and have fun with different meditations, until you find one that suits your current stage of development.

That's good advice, developing a personal "core practice" that provides some continuity and stability.   
« Last Edit: July 25, 2016, 09:38:42 am by Spiny Norman »

 


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