Author Topic: Kadampa Tradition ?s  (Read 1900 times)

Offline drakewrites

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Kadampa Tradition ?s
« on: October 22, 2012, 08:45:22 pm »
I found out the only "Buddhist group" in my area is a small get-together at a coffee-shop every Wednesday. I've been going for about two months, and plan to keep going. I even put in my work schedule that I'm not available during that time, because that's the importance I'm giving Buddhism. But... I don't consider myself knowledgeable about Buddhism to pick a particular tradition... yet, and had a few questions about Kadampa.

1. Do I have to be of the Kadampa tradition to participate in these weekly meditation/sermon get-togethers? I'm assuming not, but will they think me funny if I don't ever go to the temple and take my vows before a monk? I've noticed a few people there don't have to pay because they are members of the temple.
2. If one follows a certain tradition, is that for life?
3. I'm leaning towards Theravada or Zen, is that okay? Will my spiritual guide at this particular Kadampa get-together be offended if I tell her I want to go Theravada/Zen?
4. What's the big emphasis on Geshe Kelsang? I understand he started the tradition, etc, and wrote literally EVERY single book they have on display there, but I'm just wondering why there is such a big emphasis on Geshe. All the books they sell there are by him, we always read a sermon from one of his books, etc. I'm not complaining... everything I hear brings me so much joy to my heart, and truth, I'm just wondering.
5. Do Kadampa Buddhists believe in praying to the Buddha? My spiritual teacher does, and says that I can too, however, I don't particularly believe in this.
6. What are some other noticeable differences between Kadampa and other Buddhist traditions? Specifically, what is the path to enlightenment? How does a Kadampa Buddhist view the realms of Samsara? Literally? Figuratively? Is there any chanting? Is one already enlightened and needs to discover it, or does one seek out becoming enlightened, like in Theravada?

Thanks for any help. :) Namaste!
"He is able who thinks he is able."
-Buddha

Offline Monkey Mind

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Kadampa Tradition ?s
« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2012, 09:17:11 pm »

1- You should ask them. I'd bet you weren't the first person to ask.
2- No.
3A- yes. You can lean towards them both if you want, see #2. 3B- you should ask that person.

The rest of the questions are out of my league, I'll leave them for others to tackle.


Offline Lobster

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Re: Kadampa Tradition ?s
« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2012, 12:02:57 am »
4. Geshe Kelsang started the tradition
5. Neither are worth praying to if you feel no need. Pray to a yidam if you like when you understand what they represent . . . Cundi, Chenrezig, Tara etc.
6. There is chanting, some in English . . . other questions best asked individually or at your centre

7. You did not ask this question but I will answer it anyway.  You are well advised to slow down, this is the purpose of meditation.  :hug:

Offline Spiny Norman

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Re: Kadampa Tradition ?s
« Reply #3 on: October 23, 2012, 03:11:30 am »
3. I'm leaning towards Theravada or Zen, is that okay? Will my spiritual guide at this particular Kadampa get-together be offended if I tell her I want to go Theravada/Zen?

There is no need to make any early commitments to a particular tradition, and IMO it's a good thing to get experience of different groups and traditions.  Let us know how you get on.

Offline Caz

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Re: Kadampa Tradition ?s
« Reply #4 on: October 23, 2012, 04:27:44 am »
I found out the only "Buddhist group" in my area is a small get-together at a coffee-shop every Wednesday. I've been going for about two months, and plan to keep going. I even put in my work schedule that I'm not available during that time, because that's the importance I'm giving Buddhism. But... I don't consider myself knowledgeable about Buddhism to pick a particular tradition... yet, and had a few questions about Kadampa.

1. Do I have to be of the Kadampa tradition to participate in these weekly meditation/sermon get-togethers? I'm assuming not, but will they think me funny if I don't ever go to the temple and take my vows before a monk? I've noticed a few people there don't have to pay because they are members of the temple.
2. If one follows a certain tradition, is that for life?
3. I'm leaning towards Theravada or Zen, is that okay? Will my spiritual guide at this particular Kadampa get-together be offended if I tell her I want to go Theravada/Zen?
4. What's the big emphasis on Geshe Kelsang? I understand he started the tradition, etc, and wrote literally EVERY single book they have on display there, but I'm just wondering why there is such a big emphasis on Geshe. All the books they sell there are by him, we always read a sermon from one of his books, etc. I'm not complaining... everything I hear brings me so much joy to my heart, and truth, I'm just wondering.
5. Do Kadampa Buddhists believe in praying to the Buddha? My spiritual teacher does, and says that I can too, however, I don't particularly believe in this.
6. What are some other noticeable differences between Kadampa and other Buddhist traditions? Specifically, what is the path to enlightenment? How does a Kadampa Buddhist view the realms of Samsara? Literally? Figuratively? Is there any chanting? Is one already enlightened and needs to discover it, or does one seek out becoming enlightened, like in Theravada?

Thanks for any help. :) Namaste!


Hello there Drake

1. Anyone is welcome to go along, There is usually a small facility fee to help keep the classes running as they are usually in rented premises, Some people don't pay because they already pay a monthly fee for the centre's FP programmes, have a multiple session card, Are the teachers assistant, Or cant afford to pay.

2. No one expects you to make a traditional commitment at this stage that usually comes after one recognises the need to have stability in their Dharma practice instead of tradition flip flopping.

3. No they will not be offended but remember that these teachers teach from the Kadampa point of view and they are not an inter traditional meeting forum.

4. Every tradition has a particular emphasis on what they study Geshe Kelsang adapted traditional Gelugpa writings into a presentation that is suitable for a more international audience, He created various study programmes such as General programme, Foundation programme and Teacher training Programme to create authentic Kadampa teachers using his translations and adaptations as a basis is what the NKT does because even amongst learned teachers from the same tradition there are variations in view, Practice and emphasis and when it comes to the west translation as well. So in Short the NKT uses Geshe Kelsangs works as their corpus because he is their Spiritual guide and founder.

5. Yes Kadampa Buddhism is a Mahayana tradition this is a big part of Mahayana Buddhism, It doesn't matter if you don't believe it just keep an open mind.

6. http://kadampa.org/en/reference This explains a bit about Kadampa practice. You can also Download Modern Buddhism for free fromhttp://www.emodernbuddhism.com/?utm_source=nkt&utm_medium=banner&utm_campaign=ebook_smallfeature or Tharpa 
http://www.tharpa.com/

The Buddha taught that the realms of Samsara are Literal and this is backed up in Numerous Sutta and Sutra alike and also in latter commentaries and accomplishments of practitioners have verified this as well, There are numerous flaws to viewing Samsara as being solely metaphorical so for now it is best to know that this is not an authentic view but a conjuration of Nihilism and materialists who just want a nice philosophy.

for the remainder of your questions I would just ask at class.

 :namaste:
http://emodernbuddhism.com/

This eBook Modern Buddhism – The Path of Compassion and Wisdom, in three volumes, is being distributed freely at the request of the author Geshe Kelsang Gyatso. The author says: "Through reading and practicing the instructions given in this book, people can solve their daily problems and maintain a happy mind all the time." So that these benefits can pervade the whole world, Geshe Kelsang wishes to give this eBook freely to everyone.

We would like to request you to please respect this precious Dharma book, which functions to free living beings from suffering permanently. If you continually read and practice the advice in this book, eventually your problems caused by anger, attachment and ignorance will cease.

Please enjoy this special gift from Geshe Kelsang Gyatso, who dedicates: "May everyone who reads this book experience deep peace of mind, and accomplish the real meaning of human life."

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Re: Kadampa Tradition ?s
« Reply #5 on: October 23, 2012, 06:53:56 am »

3. I'm leaning towards Theravada or Zen, is that okay? Will my spiritual guide at this particular Kadampa get-together be offended if I tell her I want to go Theravada/Zen?

Of course it's okay.  You can follow whatever tradition suits you.

Whether or not someone gets offended by this is entirely dependent on how you present it to them.  If you make it sound like Zen and Theraveda are great and your NKT friends are a bunch of droolers, then yes, they are likely to be offended by that.

Quote
4. What's the big emphasis on Geshe Kelsang? I understand he started the tradition, etc, and wrote literally EVERY single book they have on display there, but I'm just wondering why there is such a big emphasis on Geshe. All the books they sell there are by him, we always read a sermon from one of his books, etc. I'm not complaining... everything I hear brings me so much joy to my heart, and truth, I'm just wondering.

Mahayana groups tend to focus on a single teacher.  This teacher represents the current representative of his or her teaching and practice lineage.  In the NKT there is Geshe Kelsang; Nalanbodhi has Ponlop Rinpoche; Shambala has the Sakyong, and so on.  Other teachers may be called upon both from within and without the lineage.  The degree to which this happens depends on the group in question; some tend to stay with one teacher and/or teachers trained by him/her and others will be all over the map. 

You should pay particular attention to the degree of connection you sense with with a teacher.  If you believe there's a connection, then study with that teacher and practice under their direction.   If there is no connection,  maintain an open heart until a connection is found elsewhere.



Offline drakewrites

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Re: Kadampa Tradition ?s
« Reply #6 on: October 27, 2012, 08:48:58 am »
Thank you all so much! All of your replies make me very, very happy. :) Namaste.
"He is able who thinks he is able."
-Buddha

 


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