Author Topic: Japanese Vajrayana: Shingon (A Simple Introduction)  (Read 13988 times)

Offline t

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Re: Japanese Vajrayana: Shingon (A Simple Introduction)
« Reply #15 on: June 14, 2010, 07:32:40 am »
Quote
...if there is still esoteric school in Chinese Buddhism...

See here

Offline tktru

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Re: Japanese Vajrayana: Shingon (A Simple Introduction)
« Reply #16 on: June 15, 2010, 12:00:01 am »
There is Chinese esotericism, however it's very limited. I believe Rev. Eijo has a better answer than I do, but right around the time Kukai left Tang China and Huiguo Ajari died, the new emperor at the time for political reasons and religious bias, lashed out at Buddhism, and just about wiped out Tang Esotericism.

The website t posted was mentioned on E-Sangha before it was taken offline. A lot of Chinese esotericism today could have gone through Shingon in Japan first if the lineage was continuing.
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Offline Mani

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Re: Japanese Vajrayana: Shingon (A Simple Introduction)
« Reply #17 on: June 15, 2010, 07:09:12 am »
Yes, Vajrayana is alive and well in mainland China.  Just as Tibetan Vajrayana has it's own uniqueness, so does Chinese Vajrayana, which in both cases is based on culture. I think the difference is comparable to say, the difference between Tibetan Vajrayana and that of Indian Vajrayana before being introduced into Tibet. I think essentially, the core aspects of Vajrayana are the same, and the differences come from adapting to the local cultures. Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche gave a good analogy in this sense. He said that Dharma is like water. Water is water, but one must have a cup, or a container to hold the water. When you have any kind of container, the water will take the form of that container. This analogy can be viewed in terms of Dharma adapting to different cultures, and different conditions.

While in some areas close to Tibet, certain elements and practices of some of the schools and lineages have been incorporated into the Chinese Vajrayana, the difference between these two (Tibetan/Chinese) can still be said to be distinct in many ways as well. I think that it could be said that Chinese Vajrayana did not have a complete system, so in many cases aspects from the original Tang era Vajrayana (which passed into japan) are combined with aspects of Tibetan Vajrayana brought into China.  

Though the other schools are represented as well, the Gelug school is predominant in areas close to Tibet today. Just over a century ago, a few Chinese Masters went to study under a very prominent Gelug lineage holder in Tibet. The lineage was passed on, and then brought back to China. This particular unbroken lineage still exists today, surviving the troubles experienced in the 1950's. Though the Tibetan elements are still a little "touchy", there is somewhat more acceptance these days, and Vajrayana is being more widely practiced there. Skillfulness is important!

This is just a little background from my own perspective and experience.

Mani

 :namaste:


 
« Last Edit: June 15, 2010, 07:13:21 am by Mani »

Offline Rory

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Re: Japanese Vajrayana: Shingon (A Simple Introduction)
« Reply #18 on: June 16, 2010, 11:40:33 pm »
thanks a lot for all your answers. Really so interesting. I remember now Rev. Eijo was saying that Chinese monks went to Mt. Koya to get the Shingon lineage which came from China to re-introduce it. I think they returned to Taiwan, but I'm not sure.  He also said that the tantra in Japan wasn't the highest or most complete that the Tibetans had it.
  So those two streams will contribute to China having a full esoteric school, which is wonderful.
 :namaste:
rory
Om varada padme hum

Cintamani Caktra Avalokitesvara mantra
with six arms, wish-fufilling jewel to attain the wisdom of the Buddhas

Offline tktru

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Re: Japanese Vajrayana: Shingon (A Simple Introduction)
« Reply #19 on: July 26, 2010, 03:01:07 pm »
In the 1920s there was an influx of students coming from mainland China to bring the Esoteric teachings back to the homeland. Some of these organizations still exist today (mainly, if I'm not mistaken from the Guangdong/Sichuan region), such as the Mantra School for Lay Buddhists in Hong Kong (香港佛教真宗居士林) and the Ming Yue Buddhist Society (佛學明月居士林).

One prominent master (maybe not so in Western/Japanese circles) who was open to ordination and granting abhiseka to Chinese students was Gonda Raifu (權田雷斧), he was part of the Shingi Shingon Buzan-ha lineage.

More information here: http://buddhistinformatics.ddbc.edu.tw/dmcb/%E6%AC%8A%E7%94%B0%E9%9B%B7%E6%96%A7
歸命十方一切佛   æœ€å‹å¦™æ³•è©æè¡†                                    
以身口意清淨業   æ…‡æ‡ƒåˆæŽŒæ­æ•¬ç¦®

 


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