Author Topic: Tibetan spiritual leader says no need for a successor  (Read 1534 times)

Offline Dharmakara

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Tibetan spiritual leader says no need for a successor
« on: September 09, 2014, 10:43:25 am »
'Let's finish with a popular Dalai Lama': Tibetan spiritual leader says no need for successor
Agence France-Presse (Sept. 8, 2014)



The Dalai Lama has told a German newspaper that he should be the last in his line of Tibetan spiritual leaders, ending a centuries-old religious tradition from his Himalayan homeland.

“We had a Dalai Lama for almost five centuries. The 14th Dalai Lama now is very popular. Let us then finish with a popular Dalai Lama,” he told the Welt am Sonntag newspaper in an interview published on Sunday. According to the interview, the 79-year-old said his spiritual role could expire with his death.

“If a weak Dalai Lama comes along, then it will just disgrace the Dalai Lama,” he said, according to a transcript of the interview, which was conducted in English.

“Tibetan Buddhism is not dependent on one individual,” he reportedly said. “We have a very good organizational structure with highly trained monks and scholars.”

A spokesman for the Dalai Lama did not immediately answer emailed questions about the interview’s accuracy.

more here >>> http://www.scmp.com/news/asia/article/1587682/dalai-lama-says-no-need-successor-report

Offline lisehull

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Re: Tibetan spiritual leader says no need for a successor
« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2014, 12:35:19 pm »
I wonder how this will impact the tulku system.

Offline Dharmakara

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Re: Tibetan spiritual leader says no need for a successor
« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2014, 01:45:54 pm »
Considering the degree of corruption that comes along with the process of tulku recognition, it probably wouldn't missed by some practitioners, especially by those who believe that that the politics of the tulku system revolves around power first, and money second.

Offline t

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Re: Tibetan spiritual leader says no need for a successor
« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2014, 12:26:52 am »
“We had a Dalai Lama for almost five centuries. The 14th Dalai Lama now is very popular.
Let us then finish with a popular Dalai Lama,”

Let's see... there was the Great Fifth, then the Sixth, the Thirteenth...
Popular, really? 'Chenrezig' needs popularity?

“If a weak Dalai Lama comes along, then it will just disgrace the Dalai Lama,” he said, according to a transcript of the interview, which was conducted in English.
There was that all 'powerful' Great Fifth wasn't it... 'disgrace' was hardly the right term for him...
And so, the Sixth to the Thirteenth were a bunch of 'disgrace' too huh...

“Tibetan Buddhism is not dependent on one individual,” he reportedly said.
Yeah on paper...

“We have a very good organisational structure with highly trained monks and scholars.”
And the point is? Re: Jonang? Re: Gorampa vs Tsongkhapa? And what was all that forcing of monastics of all ranks within your own lineage to sign an oath or else was all about huh?

“When I am about 90 I will consult the high Lamas of the Tibetan Buddhist traditions, the Tibetan public, and other concerned people who follow Tibetan Buddhism, and re-evaluate whether the institution of the Dalai Lama should continue or not,” he said at the time.
I wonder why this wasn't an option back from the Great Fifth's time...

On the question of whether he may ever be able to return to Tibet, he said in the interview:
“Yes, I am sure of that. China can no longer isolate itself, it must follow the global trend towards a democratic society.”

What if 'Chenrezig' is wrong?

“I hope and pray that I may return to this world as long as sentient beings’ suffering remains. I mean not in the same body, but with the same spirit and the same soul.”
I hope this is an inaccurate transcript / translation or is this just an atman/jiva smuggling attempt?

The Dalai Lama used the interview to contrast China with Russia under President Vladimir Putin. Unlike China’s leaders, Russia’s ruler was too egocentric and seeking isolation, he reportedly said
The mirror, Your Holiness, the mirror...

A spokesman for the Dalai Lama did not immediately answer emailed questions about the interview’s accuracy
Fair enough...

Offline Dharmakara

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Re: Tibetan spiritual leader says no need for a successor
« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2014, 02:33:59 am »
“I hope and pray that I may return to this world as long as sentient beings’ suffering remains. I mean not in the same body, but with the same spirit and the same soul.”
I hope this is an inaccurate transcript / translation or is this just an atman/jiva smuggling attempt?

It might be a translational error, but it's kind of hard to say one way or another because everything is coming from the German article --- with that said, there are others who certainly have been less than discreet in putting forth the atman/jiva concept, so we might have to wait and see if there's any clarification in the future.

Apparently, the Fourteenth Dalai Lama was once asked if he believed he was the same person reincarnated fourteen times, where he responded "no" and said that he believes the first seven were all one personality reincarnated, while the second seven were all separate personalities --- can't make heads or tails of that one either LOL

Offline Dharmakara

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Re: Tibetan spiritual leader says no need for a successor
« Reply #5 on: September 19, 2014, 12:15:46 am »
Here's another article --- it appears to be related to the same interview, although the content being emphasized is different,

Quote
Dalai Lama says he might not be born again
http://buddhistchannel.tv/index.php?id=70,12011,0,0,1,0#.VBvTpE0tCUk

Dharmsala, India -- China has criticised the Dalai Lama and called on him to “respect” the tradition of reincarnation after the Tibetan Buddhist leader repeated his claim that he may not choose to be reborn.

In a recent interview with a German newspaper, Welt am Sonntag, the Dalai Lama underscored his belief that the tradition of the post he holds could end with him. He said Tibetan Buddhism was not dependent on a single person.

On Wednesday, a spokesman for China’s Foreign Ministry, Hua Chunying told reporters that China had a “set religious procedure and historic custom” when it came to the reincarnation of living Buddhist lamas, including the position of Dalai Lama.

“China follows a policy of freedom of religion and belief, and this naturally includes having to respect and protect the ways of passing on Tibetan Buddhism,” said Mr Hua, according to the Reuters news agency.

“The title of Dalai Lama is conferred by the central government, which has hundreds of years of history. The 14th Dalai Lama has ulterior motives, and is seeking to distort and negate history, which is damaging to the normal order of Tibetan Buddhism.”

The 14th Dalai Lama, whose real name is Tenzin Gyatso, has long been in a battle with China, having fled Tibet in 1959 after China invaded the then independent nation and establishing a government-in-exile in Dharamshala, India.

The Dalai Lama, who heads the Gelug, or “yellow hat” school of Tibetan Buddhism, believes one of the ways Beijing seeks to control Tibetan Buddhists is by getting involved in the reincarnation selection process of senior Buddhist monks.

In 1995, for example, the Dalai Lama named a boy in Tibet, Gedhun Choekyi Nyima, as the reincarnation of the previous Panchen Lama, the second highest figure in Tibetan Buddhism. But the Chinese put that boy under house arrest and installed another, Gyancain Norbu, in his place.

Today, while China insists that Gyancain Norbu is the legitimate Panchen Lama, many Tibetan Buddhists do not recognise him. Of Gedhun Choekyi Nyima, the boy chosen by the Dalai Lama, there has been no word. He was last seen in public on 17 May 1995

Many Tibetans fear that China will try and use the issue of the succession of the current Dalai Lama, who is aged 79, to create another split among Tibetan Buddhists as a means of exerting further control on Tibet.

As a result of this, the Dalai Lama has been thinking of alternatives to the traditional procedures of succession.

While China has said it is traditional for the Dalai Lama’s successor to be a male child born in Tibet, he has floated a series of other options, including the idea that his successor be born when he is still alive and that his successor could even be a woman.

He has also said there might not need to be any successor and that he could be the last of his line. What was most important, he said in 2011 after giving up his formal political role within the Tibetan exile government, was that the succession should not be used for political ends.

“Bear in mind that, apart from the reincarnation recognised through such legitimate methods, no recognition or acceptance should be given to a candidate chosen for political ends by anyone, including those in the People’s Republic of China,” he said. In 2007, he suggested a referendum could be held to decide whether or not he required a successor.


Offline Dharmakara

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Re: Tibetan spiritual leader says no need for a successor
« Reply #6 on: April 12, 2015, 03:22:17 am »
But Dalai Lama has always been the symbol to all the Tibetan Buddhist as well as all the Buddhist in the world.

In 1578 the Mongol ruler Altan Khan gave the title Dalai Lama to Sonyam Gyatso, third in a line of reborn lamas of the Gelug school of Tibetan Buddhism. The title means "ocean of wisdom" and was given posthumously to Sonyam Gyatso's predecessors.

In 1642 the 5th Dalai Lama, Lobsang Gyatso, became the spiritual and political leader of all of Tibet, an authority passed on to his successors. Since that time the succession of Dalai Lamas has been at the center of both Tibetan Buddhism and the history of the Tibetan people.

more here >>> http://buddhism.about.com/od/vajrayanabuddhism/tp/The-Succession-Of-Dalai-Lamas.ht

Offline Marcus Epicurus

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Re: Tibetan spiritual leader says no need for a successor
« Reply #7 on: April 12, 2015, 03:35:54 pm »
Ok....here is my opinion, and as such, it is not worth a hill of beans, but.....

I dont mean to be flippant or disrespectful, but.....Who Cares?

The Buddha found enlightenment on his own. ( without the help of a Dalai Lama )

Did Buddhism go away when The Buddha died? - NO !

The Buddhas last words were.... "It may be, Ananda, that some of you will say, 'without the Buddha, the Sublime Teacher, there is no teacher for us'. No, Ananda, you should not think in this way. Whatever doctrine and discipline taught and made known by me will be your teacher when I am gone."....Work hard to gain your own salvation"

I like The Dalai Lama, but Buddhism will survive whether or not he names a successor or not. :twocents:
The non-doing of any evil,
the performance of what's skillful,
the cleansing of one's own mind:
this is the teaching of the Awakened.

Offline Dharmakara

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Re: Tibetan spiritual leader says no need for a successor
« Reply #8 on: April 13, 2015, 02:13:21 am »
As a side note, the 8th Bogd Khan of Mongolia (1870-1924) declared that he would be the last incarnation of Jebtsundamba Khutuktu (Holy Venerable Lord), but this didn't stop the current Dalai Lama from recognizing a 9th Jebtsundamba Khutughtu in 1991, so it could be said that the DL's chickens have come home to roost (meaning: bad deeds or words return to discomfort their perpetrator).

Needless to say, the Dalai Lamas are creatures of habit when it comes to their political ambitions:

https://books.google.com/books?id=tXEtAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA273

 


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