Author Topic: Practicing mental restraint and mindfulness and the great benefits of the same  (Read 65 times)

Offline Rahul

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I found that practicing mental restraint combined with mindfulness brings great results. It provides immense equanimity and inner peace, which helps in attaining first jhana spontaneously and quickly. Having said that, here's how I practice them. I try to avoid letting my mind jump restlessly from topic to topic, giving up tasks when they start getting difficult or demanding, let the focus be diluted, or doing any task half-heartedly. In other words, I try to tame my mind to do whatever I need to do, with full attention and energy. To do this effectively I keep awareness of what i am doing. As soon as a desire to take a break, or go for coffee, or take out the mobile phone, or log in to a news/social media site etc... (any excuse from the mind) arises, I notice it and curb it right then and there. Yes, my body has limits as to how long I can sit or keep working on laptop etc. But when it becomes necessary to take a break for health reasons, I know it and I allow myself to relax. 

Restraint also means training the mind to not get bored, fed up, anxious, discouraged, excited etc. But such a training is possible not by blindly suppressing the mind, but by mindfully observing and restraining. I observe how my mind interprets the surrounding: e.g. what circumstances make me angry, what situations make me fed up, what makes me give up a task... Once I started observing the mind, I realized that I had very narrow boundaries of tolerance. I also realized futility of several spontaneous mental responses... such as getting anxious while waiting for an elevator. Once you realize how narrow your tolerance boundaries are, and how futile several responses are, you will be willing to train your mind to be more tolerant and have more mental stamina. From there, you keep training and observing your mind, expanding your stamina and control over it.

Practicing thus for a few days started giving me immense confidence in myself. I started feeling that I had a tighter grip over my mind. Bringing my mind to focus on a task became easier. Keeping my mind on a task for prolonged period became easier. Several symptoms of inadvertent restlessness disappeared, (wiggling legs while sitting, revolving sideways in your chair etc.). My breathing naturally slowed down. I started feeling immense peace and stability at my heart. With mindfulness I could see how restless and fickle was my mind, and how it pulled me along (or rather took me on a rollercoaster ride) throughout the day. And with mindful restraint the same mind started becoming an obedient pet of mine...

Slowly, it became easier for me to get intense focus for prolonged time. Eventually it helped me get into deeper state of meditation and i started feeling rapture (known as piti in Pali) during my meditation.

I hope this helps you in your practice. Do share with me how and what do you practice to get deeper meditative experiences.

Offline IdleChater

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I found that practicing mental restraint combined with mindfulness brings great results. It provides immense equanimity and inner peace, which helps in attaining first jhana spontaneously and quickly. Having said that, here's how I practice them. I try to avoid letting my mind jump restlessly from topic to topic, giving up tasks when they start getting difficult or demanding, let the focus be diluted, or doing any task half-heartedly. In other words, I try to tame my mind to do whatever I need to do, with full attention and energy. To do this effectively I keep awareness of what i am doing. As soon as a desire to take a break, or go for coffee, or take out the mobile phone, or log in to a news/social media site etc... (any excuse from the mind) arises, I notice it and curb it right then and there. Yes, my body has limits as to how long I can sit or keep working on laptop etc. But when it becomes necessary to take a break for health reasons, I know it and I allow myself to relax. 

Restraint also means training the mind to not get bored, fed up, anxious, discouraged, excited etc. But such a training is possible not by blindly suppressing the mind, but by mindfully observing and restraining. I observe how my mind interprets the surrounding: e.g. what circumstances make me angry, what situations make me fed up, what makes me give up a task... Once I started observing the mind, I realized that I had very narrow boundaries of tolerance. I also realized futility of several spontaneous mental responses... such as getting anxious while waiting for an elevator. Once you realize how narrow your tolerance boundaries are, and how futile several responses are, you will be willing to train your mind to be more tolerant and have more mental stamina. From there, you keep training and observing your mind, expanding your stamina and control over it.

Practicing thus for a few days started giving me immense confidence in myself. I started feeling that I had a tighter grip over my mind. Bringing my mind to focus on a task became easier. Keeping my mind on a task for prolonged period became easier. Several symptoms of inadvertent restlessness disappeared, (wiggling legs while sitting, revolving sideways in your chair etc.). My breathing naturally slowed down. I started feeling immense peace and stability at my heart. With mindfulness I could see how restless and fickle was my mind, and how it pulled me along (or rather took me on a rollercoaster ride) throughout the day. And with mindful restraint the same mind started becoming an obedient pet of mine...

Slowly, it became easier for me to get intense focus for prolonged time. Eventually it helped me get into deeper state of meditation and i started feeling rapture (known as piti in Pali) during my meditation.

I hope this helps you in your practice. Do share with me how and what do you practice to get deeper meditative experiences.

I have no interest in "restraint".  I have no interest in intensity.  I am not particularly interested in deeper medatative states.  What you describe sounds likeva game of whack-a-mole.  I'm not interested in that.

What I do, is sit and rest the mind.  As the mind settles and becomes quiet.  Then I do other practices.  lately I've been doing an Amithaba practice for my late mother. 
« Last Edit: November 07, 2017, 07:23:19 am by IdleChater »

Offline ground

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I hope this helps you in your practice. Do share with me how and what do you practice to get deeper meditative experiences.

I practice rationality. The basis of the practice of rationality is what can be directly perceived with the senses. This practice does not lead to experiences, meditative or other, but to the cessation of experiences and the cessation of the practice that led to it.  :fu:
« Last Edit: November 07, 2017, 09:22:05 am by ground »

 


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