Author Topic: Red symbol on beaded necklaces?  (Read 1425 times)

Offline Klein

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Red symbol on beaded necklaces?
« on: August 27, 2014, 10:08:07 pm »
I'm very curious about these.
I spent hours searching about these but not knowing the name of this made it quite hard.

Are these religious symbols?
Relating to Buddhism?
What are they called?

Thanks to all who helped me find information!

Offline t

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Re: Red symbol on beaded necklaces?
« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2014, 01:38:53 am »

Offline GoWithTheFlow

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Re: Red symbol on beaded necklaces?
« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2014, 01:32:38 pm »
But doesn't the necklace have a six pointed wheel not an eight pointed one?

Offline t

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Re: Red symbol on beaded necklaces?
« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2014, 11:11:47 pm »
Firstly, I could not see the red cakra pic clearly as it was too small for me.
Secondly, I proposed to the OP to know the standard representation of cakra in Buddhism, namely the Dharmacakra, if that would spur him/her on to research more on other type of cakras...

Anyway, here's some samples...

The twelve spoked one: Dependent Origination in 12 Links

Then there's the Ashokcakra with 24 spokes:
Dependant Origination with its 12 Links in clockwise and anticlockwise orders.
Also another one with 24 virtues in meaning, the twelve months of a year & zodiac lunar cycle

Then the six spoked one: samsara/bhava cakra: representing the six realms of samsara, sometimes with the three animals representing the three poisons

Then, the four spoked one: representing the Four Noble Truths, Four Dhyanas, the four cardinal directions or seasons

Then there's the eight spoked one: The Noble Eightfold Path (sometimes featured with a circle in the centre with three circular waves representing the Three Turnings OR a swastika which denotes the turning of the Teaching with values like goodwill, compassion, and generosity to all sentient beings) 

Then there's the ten spoked one: all tenfold directions of the compass

The thirty one cakra: the 31 planes of existence

The three hundred and sixty spoked one: a year's worth of days in the Indian lunar calendar   

The thousand spoked wheel (also found on the Buddha's feet and palms): the advent of a thousand Buddhas in the Fortunate Aeon and significance of the merit from having served spiritual teachers & selfless service to all
« Last Edit: August 29, 2014, 11:42:38 pm by t »

Offline GoWithTheFlow

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Re: Red symbol on beaded necklaces?
« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2014, 01:34:11 pm »
You learn something every day! Thank you for the detailed listing, t!  :anjali:

Offline Dharmakara

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Re: Red symbol on beaded necklaces?
« Reply #5 on: August 31, 2014, 06:14:32 am »
Firstly, I could not see the red cakra pic clearly as it was too small for me.


Ditto... it's probably time for me to get a stronger pair of reading glasses because even with a magnifying glass I still couldn't make out whether it was four, six, or eight spokes. Anyway, several years ago I came across the following bhavacakra and it continues to be my favorite version.

Patrul Rinpoche states[1]: "The term samsara, the wheel or round of existence, is used here to mean going round and round from one place to another in a circle, like a potter's wheel, or the wheel of a water mill. When a fly is trapped in a closed jar, no matter where it flies, it can not get out. Likewise, whether we are born in the higher or lower realms, we are never outside samsara. The upper part of the jar is like the higher realms of gods and men, and the lower part like the three unfortunate realms. It is said that samsara is a circle because we turn round and round, taking rebirth in one after another of the six realms as a result of our own actions, which, whether positive or negative, are tainted by clinging."




According to Mark Epstein[2], "the entire Wheel of Life is but a representation of the possibility of transforming suffering by changing the way we relate to it. As the Buddha taught in his final exhortation to his faithful attendant Ananda, it is only through becoming a "lamp unto yourself" that enlightenment can be won. Liberation from the Wheel of Life does not mean escape, the Buddha implied. It means clear perception of oneself, of the entire range of the human experience ..."


[1] Patrul Rinpoche. The Words of My Perfect Teacher, translated by the Padmakara Translation Group.
[2] Epstein, Mark (2004). Thoughts Without A Thinker: Psychotherapy from a Buddhist Perspective. Basic Books.


 


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