Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
1
Writers' Page / Shine Silently
« Last post by philboyd on Today at 07:38:04 pm »
there is a heart that beats unbound
chained not to sky or ground
seeks not for magic or mystery
practical life, shines silently
witness change in everything
the same for everyone
open space for all to be
peaceful life, shines silently
on the road, stress and noise
greed hate and lots of toys
create effect on society
virtuous life, shines silently
2
The Dharma Express / Re: There is only space and movement
« Last post by ground on October 19, 2017, 09:18:55 pm »
Movement can only be perceived when there is affirmation of self. Emptiness of self entails emptiness of movement.  :fu:
3
Mahayana / Re: The Contemplation Sutra of Buddha Amitayus & Zen Buddhism
« Last post by Dharma Flower on October 19, 2017, 02:51:06 pm »
In the words of Zen master Dogen, “You should therefore cease from practice based on intellectual understanding, pursuing words and following after speech, and learn the backward step that turns your light inwardly to illuminate your self. Body and mind of themselves will drop away, and your original face will be manifest.”

Reciting the name of Amida Buddha is not based on intellectual understanding, through words and speech. It is instead the backstep to realizing Amida as our inward light, our original face from before our parents were born.  The name Amida means “boundless light,” our true nature when body and mind, the false ego-self, drop away.

At the conventional level of understanding, Amida is a being outside ourselves, and the Pure Land is a realm we can be reborn into after death. At the highest level of understanding, Amida is our own true nature, and the Pure Land is the mind when purified of delusion and selfishness.

The higher understanding of Pure Land practice isn’t superior to the conventional understanding. It’s instead based on whatever people need to get them to recite the Nembutsu. It’s adapting the teaching to the different understandings of people as upaya or skillful means:
https://www.thoughtco.com/upaya-skillful-or-expedient-means-450018

Seeing the Pure Land as a reality accessible here and now doesn’t reject that there is a Pure Land after death. But all we have right now is the here and now, and the Buddha emphasized the here and now. We can’t be 100% sure what happens after death until we experience it ourselves:

Quote
The Buddha always told his disciples not to waste their time and energy in metaphysical speculation. Whenever he was asked a metaphysical question, he remained silent. Instead, he directed his disciples toward practical efforts. Questioned one day about the problem of the infinity of the world, the Buddha said, “Whether the world is finite or infinite, limited or unlimited, the problem of your liberation remains the same.” Another time he said, “Suppose a man is struck by a poisoned arrow and the doctor wishes to take out the arrow immediately. Suppose the man does not want the arrow removed until he knows who shot it, his age, his parents, and why he shot it. What would happen? If he were to wait until all these questions have been answered, the man might die first.” Life is so short. It must not be spent in endless metaphysical speculation that does not bring us any closer to the truth.[2]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parable_of_the_Poisoned_Arrow
4
Mahayana / Re: The Contemplation Sutra of Buddha Amitayus & Zen Buddhism
« Last post by Dharma Flower on October 19, 2017, 02:50:39 pm »
This luminous mind is also referred to as Buddha-nature, which is every being’s innate potential for enlightenment. In reciting the name, Namu-Amida-Butsu, we are calling forth the primally radiant nature of our mind:   

How does that work, practically speaking?  Is there an element of faith involved?  There are many different Buddhist mantras of course.

My favourite is the Prajnaparamita.

Quote
At the popular level, the Pure Land of Amitabha Buddha is an ideal training ground, an ideal environment where the practitioner is reborn thanks both to his own efforts and the power of Amitabha Buddha’s vows…

At the advanced level, i.e. for cultivators of high spiritual capacity, the Pure Land method, like other methods, reverts the ordinary, deluded mind to the Self-nature True Mind. In the process wisdom and Buddhahood are eventually attained.

The high-level form of Pure Land is practiced by those of deep spiritual capacities:

“When the mind is pure, the Buddha land is pure …to recite the Buddha’s name is to recite the Mind.”

In its totality, Pure Land reflects the highest teaching of Buddhism as expressed in the Avatamsaka Sutra: mutual identity and interpenetrating…

Faith means faith in Amitabha Buddha’s Vows to rescue all who recite His name, as well as faith in one’s own Self-Nature, which is intrinsically the same as His (to recite the Buddha’s name is to recite the Mind).

Vows are the determination to be reborn in the Pure Land - in one’s pure mind - so as to be in the position to save oneself and others.

Practice generally means reciting the Buddha’s name (NAMU-AMIDA-BUTSU) to the point where one’s Mind and that of Amitabha Buddha are in unison…
https://quangduc.com/a31792/introduction-to-pure-land

The highest level of Pure Land practice is beyond belief and disbelief in a dualistic sense, since it seeks to experience and realize Amida as our own Buddha-nature.
5
Buddha Basics - Beginner Zone / Re: Different Areas Of Buddhism
« Last post by jimsouth on October 19, 2017, 12:15:06 pm »
Quote
Unknown source:  "Sometimes your destiny waits at the end of the path, you took to avoid it".

Hi, jimsouth.  The quote could be speaking to serendipity , the state of randomness or chaos which exists in our lives, or it could be asserting Moslem beliefs in Kismet, the condition whereby we are destined to experience certain events in our lives.

Buddhism asserts nothing like the latter (kismet) except to the idea that our intentional actions result in consequences.  However, we have the ability to influence our outcomes simply by examining the potential results of our intentional actions and making reasonable adjustments to our behavior to create more beneficial effects.  This is fundamental to Buddha's Law of Kamma as he discussed with his son, Rahula in MN 61 PTS: M i 414
Ambalatthika-rahulovada Sutta: Instructions to Rahula at Mango Stone:

https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.061.than.html

Quote
"What do you think, Rahula: What is a mirror for?"

"For reflection, sir."

"In the same way, Rahula, bodily actions, verbal actions, & mental actions are to be done with repeated reflection.

"Whenever you want to do a bodily action, you should reflect on it: 'This bodily action I want to do — would it lead to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both? Would it be an unskillful bodily action, with painful consequences, painful results?' If, on reflection, you know that it would lead to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both; it would be an unskillful bodily action with painful consequences, painful results, then any bodily action of that sort is absolutely unfit for you to do. But if on reflection you know that it would not cause affliction... it would be a skillful bodily action with pleasant consequences, pleasant results, then any bodily action of that sort is fit for you to do.

"While you are doing a bodily action, you should reflect on it: 'This bodily action I am doing — is it leading to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both? Is it an unskillful bodily action, with painful consequences, painful results?' If, on reflection, you know that it is leading to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both... you should give it up. But if on reflection you know that it is not... you may continue with it.

"Having done a bodily action, you should reflect on it: 'This bodily action I have done — did it lead to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both? Was it an unskillful bodily action, with painful consequences, painful results?' If, on reflection, you know that it led to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both; it was an unskillful bodily action with painful consequences, painful results, then you should confess it, reveal it, lay it open to the Teacher or to a knowledgeable companion in the holy life. Having confessed it... you should exercise restraint in the future. But if on reflection you know that it did not lead to affliction... it was a skillful bodily action with pleasant consequences, pleasant results, then you should stay mentally refreshed & joyful, training day & night in skillful mental qualities.

"Whenever you want to do a verbal action, you should reflect on it: 'This verbal action I want to do — would it lead to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both? Would it be an unskillful verbal action, with painful consequences, painful results?' If, on reflection, you know that it would lead to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both; it would be an unskillful verbal action with painful consequences, painful results, then any verbal action of that sort is absolutely unfit for you to do. But if on reflection you know that it would not cause affliction... it would be a skillful verbal action with pleasant consequences, pleasant results, then any verbal action of that sort is fit for you to do.

"While you are doing a verbal action, you should reflect on it: 'This verbal action I am doing — is it leading to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both? Is it an unskillful verbal action, with painful consequences, painful results?' If, on reflection, you know that it is leading to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both... you should give it up. But if on reflection you know that it is not... you may continue with it.

"Having done a verbal action, you should reflect on it: 'This verbal action I have done — did it lead to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both? Was it an unskillful verbal action, with painful consequences, painful results?' If, on reflection, you know that it led to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both; it was an unskillful verbal action with painful consequences, painful results, then you should confess it, reveal it, lay it open to the Teacher or to a knowledgeable companion in the holy life. Having confessed it... you should exercise restraint in the future. But if on reflection you know that it did not lead to affliction... it was a skillful verbal action with pleasant consequences, pleasant results, then you should stay mentally refreshed & joyful, training day & night in skillful mental qualities.

"Whenever you want to do a mental action, you should reflect on it: 'This mental action I want to do — would it lead to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both? Would it be an unskillful mental action, with painful consequences, painful results?' If, on reflection, you know that it would lead to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both; it would be an unskillful mental action with painful consequences, painful results, then any mental action of that sort is absolutely unfit for you to do. But if on reflection you know that it would not cause affliction... it would be a skillful mental action with pleasant consequences, pleasant results, then any mental action of that sort is fit for you to do.

"While you are doing a mental action, you should reflect on it: 'This mental action I am doing — is it leading to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both? Is it an unskillful mental action, with painful consequences, painful results?' If, on reflection, you know that it is leading to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both... you should give it up. But if on reflection you know that it is not... you may continue with it.

"Having done a mental action, you should reflect on it: 'This mental action I have done — did it lead to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both? Was it an unskillful mental action, with painful consequences, painful results?' If, on reflection, you know that it led to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both; it was an unskillful mental action with painful consequences, painful results, then you should feel distressed, ashamed, & disgusted with it. Feeling distressed, ashamed, & disgusted with it, you should exercise restraint in the future. But if on reflection you know that it did not lead to affliction... it was a skillful mental action with pleasant consequences, pleasant results, then you should stay mentally refreshed & joyful, training day & night in skillful mental qualities.

"Rahula, all those brahmans & contemplatives in the course of the past who purified their bodily actions, verbal actions, & mental actions, did it through repeated reflection on their bodily actions, verbal actions, & mental actions in just this way.

"All those brahmans & contemplatives in the course of the future who will purify their bodily actions, verbal actions, & mental actions, will do it through repeated reflection on their bodily actions, verbal actions, & mental actions in just this way.

"All those brahmans & contemplatives at present who purify their bodily actions, verbal actions, & mental actions, do it through repeated reflection on their bodily actions, verbal actions, & mental actions in just this way.

"Thus, Rahula, you should train yourself: 'I will purify my bodily actions through repeated reflection. I will purify my verbal actions through repeated reflection. I will purify my mental actions through repeated reflection.' That's how you should train yourself."

That is what the Blessed One said. Gratified, Ven. Rahula delighted in the Blessed One's words.
Sort of a causality thing. You can take conscious steps in life, to avoid courting disaster; but still hit a wall. Good actions do not guarantee good reactions. You can stumble through life, with no rhyme or reason, and still come out of the mix smelling like roses.
I have tried to view life in depth, like a game of chess. If I make this move, what other moves can I anticipate; and not just the next move, but 4 or 5 moves down the line.
6
Buddha Basics - Beginner Zone / Re: Different Areas Of Buddhism
« Last post by jimsouth on October 19, 2017, 11:44:52 am »
Quote
Unknown source:  "Sometimes your destiny waits at the end of the path, you took to avoid it".

Hi, jimsouth.  The quote could be speaking to serendipity , the state of randomness or chaos which exists in our lives, or it could be asserting Moslem beliefs in Kismet, the condition whereby we are destined to experience certain events in our lives.

Buddhism asserts nothing like the latter (kismet) except to the idea that our intentional actions result in consequences.  However, we have the ability to influence our outcomes simply by examining the potential results of our intentional actions and making reasonable adjustments to our behavior to create more beneficial effects.  This is fundamental to Buddha's Law of Kamma as he discussed with his son, Rahula in MN 61 PTS: M i 414
Ambalatthika-rahulovada Sutta: Instructions to Rahula at Mango Stone:

https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.061.than.html

Quote
"What do you think, Rahula: What is a mirror for?"

"For reflection, sir."

"In the same way, Rahula, bodily actions, verbal actions, & mental actions are to be done with repeated reflection.

"Whenever you want to do a bodily action, you should reflect on it: 'This bodily action I want to do — would it lead to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both? Would it be an unskillful bodily action, with painful consequences, painful results?' If, on reflection, you know that it would lead to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both; it would be an unskillful bodily action with painful consequences, painful results, then any bodily action of that sort is absolutely unfit for you to do. But if on reflection you know that it would not cause affliction... it would be a skillful bodily action with pleasant consequences, pleasant results, then any bodily action of that sort is fit for you to do.

"While you are doing a bodily action, you should reflect on it: 'This bodily action I am doing — is it leading to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both? Is it an unskillful bodily action, with painful consequences, painful results?' If, on reflection, you know that it is leading to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both... you should give it up. But if on reflection you know that it is not... you may continue with it.

"Having done a bodily action, you should reflect on it: 'This bodily action I have done — did it lead to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both? Was it an unskillful bodily action, with painful consequences, painful results?' If, on reflection, you know that it led to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both; it was an unskillful bodily action with painful consequences, painful results, then you should confess it, reveal it, lay it open to the Teacher or to a knowledgeable companion in the holy life. Having confessed it... you should exercise restraint in the future. But if on reflection you know that it did not lead to affliction... it was a skillful bodily action with pleasant consequences, pleasant results, then you should stay mentally refreshed & joyful, training day & night in skillful mental qualities.

"Whenever you want to do a verbal action, you should reflect on it: 'This verbal action I want to do — would it lead to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both? Would it be an unskillful verbal action, with painful consequences, painful results?' If, on reflection, you know that it would lead to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both; it would be an unskillful verbal action with painful consequences, painful results, then any verbal action of that sort is absolutely unfit for you to do. But if on reflection you know that it would not cause affliction... it would be a skillful verbal action with pleasant consequences, pleasant results, then any verbal action of that sort is fit for you to do.

"While you are doing a verbal action, you should reflect on it: 'This verbal action I am doing — is it leading to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both? Is it an unskillful verbal action, with painful consequences, painful results?' If, on reflection, you know that it is leading to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both... you should give it up. But if on reflection you know that it is not... you may continue with it.

"Having done a verbal action, you should reflect on it: 'This verbal action I have done — did it lead to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both? Was it an unskillful verbal action, with painful consequences, painful results?' If, on reflection, you know that it led to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both; it was an unskillful verbal action with painful consequences, painful results, then you should confess it, reveal it, lay it open to the Teacher or to a knowledgeable companion in the holy life. Having confessed it... you should exercise restraint in the future. But if on reflection you know that it did not lead to affliction... it was a skillful verbal action with pleasant consequences, pleasant results, then you should stay mentally refreshed & joyful, training day & night in skillful mental qualities.

"Whenever you want to do a mental action, you should reflect on it: 'This mental action I want to do — would it lead to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both? Would it be an unskillful mental action, with painful consequences, painful results?' If, on reflection, you know that it would lead to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both; it would be an unskillful mental action with painful consequences, painful results, then any mental action of that sort is absolutely unfit for you to do. But if on reflection you know that it would not cause affliction... it would be a skillful mental action with pleasant consequences, pleasant results, then any mental action of that sort is fit for you to do.

"While you are doing a mental action, you should reflect on it: 'This mental action I am doing — is it leading to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both? Is it an unskillful mental action, with painful consequences, painful results?' If, on reflection, you know that it is leading to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both... you should give it up. But if on reflection you know that it is not... you may continue with it.

"Having done a mental action, you should reflect on it: 'This mental action I have done — did it lead to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both? Was it an unskillful mental action, with painful consequences, painful results?' If, on reflection, you know that it led to self-affliction, to the affliction of others, or to both; it was an unskillful mental action with painful consequences, painful results, then you should feel distressed, ashamed, & disgusted with it. Feeling distressed, ashamed, & disgusted with it, you should exercise restraint in the future. But if on reflection you know that it did not lead to affliction... it was a skillful mental action with pleasant consequences, pleasant results, then you should stay mentally refreshed & joyful, training day & night in skillful mental qualities.

"Rahula, all those brahmans & contemplatives in the course of the past who purified their bodily actions, verbal actions, & mental actions, did it through repeated reflection on their bodily actions, verbal actions, & mental actions in just this way.

"All those brahmans & contemplatives in the course of the future who will purify their bodily actions, verbal actions, & mental actions, will do it through repeated reflection on their bodily actions, verbal actions, & mental actions in just this way.

"All those brahmans & contemplatives at present who purify their bodily actions, verbal actions, & mental actions, do it through repeated reflection on their bodily actions, verbal actions, & mental actions in just this way.

"Thus, Rahula, you should train yourself: 'I will purify my bodily actions through repeated reflection. I will purify my verbal actions through repeated reflection. I will purify my mental actions through repeated reflection.' That's how you should train yourself."

That is what the Blessed One said. Gratified, Ven. Rahula delighted in the Blessed One's words.
Sort of a causality thing. You can take conscious steps in life, to avoid courting disaster; but still hit a wall. Good actions do not guarantee good reactions. You can stumble through life, with no rhyme or reason, and still come out of the mix smelling like roses.
7
Tea Room / Re: hello friends, please help & share!
« Last post by jimsouth on October 19, 2017, 09:28:05 am »
I have never had a problem baring my soul, if I knew I did nothing wrong, and needed help. I'm not saying borrowing money to pay for an education is wrong; but anyone who borrows, does so knowing the debt must be repaid. I am dealing with an issue I never asked for; but I was honorable enough to step up & take charge. My wife & I are raising two grandchildren. We now live on a fixed income, and must make the best of it. We are both dealing with health issues, no longer young, & no longer have the physical energy we once had. It's become living from month to month. Stepping up for two innocent children was the right thing to do; but it has taken a financial toll; and we live a Spartan existence. They are the children of my wife's son from her first marriage. Myself, I have no biological connection, and I have no legal connection that would compel me to raise/support these children; but there is no connection stronger than love. I would accept help if I could locate it; if for no other reason than to continue to keep the children safe.
8
Tea Room / Re: Buddhist Notion Of Justified War Or Violence.
« Last post by jimsouth on October 19, 2017, 08:50:27 am »
I don't believe Christ ever preached, do not defend yourself.

What about turning the other cheek?
I ( personally ) believe that means, be as forgiving as is humanly possible; after that, someone's gonna get their head busted. I always tried to live a low profile, stay under the radar. Old adage: "Beware of the quiet man".
9
Tea Room / Re: Buddhist Notion Of Justified War Or Violence.
« Last post by Spiny Norman on October 19, 2017, 07:10:19 am »
I don't believe Christ ever preached, do not defend yourself.

What about turning the other cheek?
10
Mahayana / Re: The Contemplation Sutra of Buddha Amitayus & Zen Buddhism
« Last post by Spiny Norman on October 19, 2017, 07:07:31 am »
This luminous mind is also referred to as Buddha-nature, which is every being’s innate potential for enlightenment. In reciting the name, Namu-Amida-Butsu, we are calling forth the primally radiant nature of our mind:   

How does that work, practically speaking?  Is there an element of faith involved?  There are many different Buddhist mantras of course.

My favourite is the Prajnaparamita.
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10

SimplePortal 2.3.3 © 2008-2010, SimplePortal