Author Topic: Recite Buddhist sutra in sanskrit  (Read 408 times)

Offline nilegem

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Recite Buddhist sutra in sanskrit
« on: August 01, 2016, 03:27:07 am »
I would like to talk about a new experience in my Buddhism learning. It is about Buddhism practice of chanting Sanskrit sutra

Let me start by giving an example, if my Chinese first name is Huang, and someone calls me "Hi Yellow", do you think I would response to that person's call?

Similarly, we have Guan Shi Yin as a Chinese translation of a Bodhisattva name, if you keep chanting Guan Shi Yin, no one would respond to you, simply because it is not his name

Guan Shi Yin Sanskrit name is Avalokiteswara, now chanting this name will be of benefits

Every sound has a characteristic, the meaning is different, in one culture, Si may means 4, but in another culture, same pronunciation may mean a different thing, the name is made up, the but sound is the same

I have started chanting the Lotus sutra in Sanskrit and have reaped very good results, I suggest you first start by learning about the mystery of the Sanskrit language, it is said that if a word in Sanskrit is pronounced, a form connected with that word will be existing within your mind, which is why when a sutra is read, the Buddha form connected with that sound is reconstructed in your mind, and will bless you

Offline stillpointdancer

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Re: Recite Buddhist sutra in sanskrit
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2016, 02:46:35 am »
I don't know about that, but I have spent some years with practice that involves chanting mantras in Pali, I think. Gate, gate,....  etc. I found it to be a powerful experience. Some say you don't need to translate them in order to recite them. I prefer to know what they mean, but to chant in the original language.
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

Offline Spiny Norman

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Re: Recite Buddhist sutra in sanskrit
« Reply #2 on: August 02, 2016, 03:27:42 am »
I don't know about that, but I have spent some years with practice that involves chanting mantras in Pali, I think. Gate, gate,....  etc. I found it to be a powerful experience. Some say you don't need to translate them in order to recite them. I prefer to know what they mean, but to chant in the original language.

I think one of the advantages of using the original language is that English translations can be misleading and incomplete.  Retaining the word in the original language allows our understanding to develop.  For example "dukkha" is often translated as "suffering", but this doesn't really do it justice.

Offline stillpointdancer

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Re: Recite Buddhist sutra in sanskrit
« Reply #3 on: August 03, 2016, 03:31:46 am »
I don't know about that, but I have spent some years with practice that involves chanting mantras in Pali, I think. Gate, gate,....  etc. I found it to be a powerful experience. Some say you don't need to translate them in order to recite them. I prefer to know what they mean, but to chant in the original language.

I think one of the advantages of using the original language is that English translations can be misleading and incomplete.  Retaining the word in the original language allows our understanding to develop.  For example "dukkha" is often translated as "suffering", but this doesn't really do it justice.
You are right, Spiny Norman. I'm researching mindfulness at the moment, and, as you say, translations don't really do it justice.
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

Offline Spiny Norman

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Re: Recite Buddhist sutra in sanskrit
« Reply #4 on: August 03, 2016, 04:37:43 am »
I don't know about that, but I have spent some years with practice that involves chanting mantras in Pali, I think. Gate, gate,....  etc. I found it to be a powerful experience. Some say you don't need to translate them in order to recite them. I prefer to know what they mean, but to chant in the original language.

I think one of the advantages of using the original language is that English translations can be misleading and incomplete.  Retaining the word in the original language allows our understanding to develop.  For example "dukkha" is often translated as "suffering", but this doesn't really do it justice.
You are right, Spiny Norman. I'm researching mindfulness at the moment, and, as you say, translations don't really do it justice.

Mindfulness, eh? You could right a book about that, and in fact many people have.  ;)

I've been working with satipatthana for some time, it is absolutely fascinating.

 


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