Author Topic: mental health professionals  (Read 1524 times)

Offline Timbo

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mental health professionals
« on: March 17, 2010, 06:25:25 pm »
Hi,

I'm a mental health professional, in full-time private practice. I guess I am a Buddhist, though perhaps not conventional in my approach. I'm interested in integrating Buddhist ideas and techniques with more conventional psychotherapy practices. It would be nice to exchange ideas with like-minded others.

We probably have others like me on registered on the site, possible enough to justify a new forum, or sub-forum. Just a thought...


Hugs and puppies,

Timbo

Offline Heartbeat

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Re: mental health professionals
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2010, 05:15:25 am »

I am very new to FreeSangha so just read the post....
It is months since the first posting but here goes anyway.

Today I posted this on another site but would like any feedback from folks here.





Hi to any therapists out there.

I am just in the door from having attended the first day of introductory training in ACT therapy.

As an art therapist and a nurse in private psychiatry I have been trying to find an accepted therapeutic framework to relate to the difficulties patients face that is compatible with my Buddhist practice.

As my study of Buddhism deepens, I have felt uncomfortable with many of the established methods of therapy that once I would not have questioned.

Acceptance and Commitment therapy, at first glance, seemed very similar to Buddhist philosophy.

Now attendance for one day at a two day introductory session does not qualify me for anything...but on the surface it seems to be what I am looking for.


Could anyone tell me if they use parts of this therapy?

Are there some contradictions/oppositions or discord with what the Buddha taught?

The two day workshop is run by Russ Harris who has Published 'ACT made simple', ' ACT with love', and more recently 'The Happiness Trap'.
Russ lives here in Melbourne, Australia.

He mentions Buddhism (and other religions) but denies any closer link.
It smells sweetly of Buddhism from where I am standing now.

With Metta

Offline Monkey Mind

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Re: mental health professionals
« Reply #2 on: August 03, 2010, 09:04:28 pm »
I read "Mindfulness for Two: An Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Approach to Mindfulness in Psychotherapy" by Kelly Wilson. Seems to support your claim. Steven Hayes, the creator of ACT, has stated that ACT is not at all related to Buddhism, but at the same time he is an avid vipassana meditator.

In my therapy practice, I struggle with my own beliefs of "Dharma is the original and still best psychotherapy" with the expectation that I must be secular in my presentation to clients. ACT and DBT both seem like ways of reframing Dharma in psychological terms. Works for me.

Offline ChangYuan

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Re: mental health professionals
« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2010, 09:11:56 am »
Thank you very much for bringing this model to my attention. I am currently going to school to be a Substance Abuse counselor, and have been looking over the different therapy models to see which fits well for me. I have actually written to some people in my field about this to see if they kn ow how well it would be able to be applied.
地藏菩萨灭定业真言
OM BA LA MO LING TO NING SVAHA

Offline Monkey Mind

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Re: mental health professionals
« Reply #4 on: August 11, 2010, 10:29:04 am »
Both the DBT and the ACT people have created a lot of materials for substance abuse and addiction. When I get an opportunity later today, I will send you some materials.

 


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