Author Topic: Meeting a Rimpoche  (Read 692 times)

Offline Rasputin

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Meeting a Rimpoche
« on: October 25, 2018, 03:47:16 pm »
So, tomorrow I’m meeting a Rimpoche. What is the correct protocol? My root guru was a rimpoche as well, but he left monastic life and did not want people to prostrate before him and such. This one is still a monastic. Do I offer him a Khatag? What if he rejects it? Like, say he has a bunch more at home?

Offline Chaz

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Re: Meeting a Rimpoche
« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2018, 04:31:47 pm »
So, tomorrow I’m meeting a Rimpoche. What is the correct protocol? My root guru was a rimpoche as well, but he left monastic life and did not want people to prostrate before him and such. This one is still a monastic. Do I offer him a Khatag? What if he rejects it? Like, say he has a bunch more at home?

Check with his attendents regarding prostration and the Katag.  Bring one in any event.

My guru doesn't like students prostrating to him either.  Old school monastics like Thrangu Rinpoche like it.

Be respectfull.  When you meet him, bow slightly, so your head is lower than his.  Your hands in "anjali" , palms together as if holding a precious jewel.  If you offer a katag, you do so with your hands in anjali and the katag cradled between thumbs and forefingers.  Bow as you offer it.  He will take the the katag from you and then return it by draping it over the back of your neck.  Keep it.  It is a blessed object.

Offline Rasputin

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Re: Meeting a Rimpoche
« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2018, 07:06:24 pm »
Should I genuflect? Kiss his feet? Should I lie on the floor and go into convulsions?

Offline Chaz

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Re: Meeting a Rimpoche
« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2018, 10:32:49 am »
Should I genuflect? Kiss his feet? Should I lie on the floor and go into convulsions?

Where does THAT come from, dude?  You asked what to do, and I explained.

If you're all wierd about this apparent disrespect for their traditions and what is considered to be both appropriate and correct behavior, it would probably be best if you didn't go to meet this person at all.

Offline Gibbon

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Re: Meeting a Rimpoche
« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2018, 01:26:31 pm »
Should I genuflect? Kiss his feet? Should I lie on the floor and go into convulsions?

Where does THAT come from, dude?  You asked what to do, and I explained.

If you're all wierd about this apparent disrespect for their traditions and what is considered to be both appropriate and correct behavior, it would probably be best if you didn't go to meet this person at all.

Yes, this is a strange response response to sincere, helpful advice.  Maybe not going would be better?

Offline Rasputin

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Re: Meeting a Rimpoche
« Reply #5 on: October 27, 2018, 05:17:13 am »
Oh, I went. And he was cool. After the talk I went up to him. He stuck out his hand and i said tonhim, “Tashi Delek.” (He spoke English. His talk was all in English with a few Tibetan words mixed in). He asked me how I knew that phrase and whether or not I could read Tibetan.  I told him no. He told me I should learn to read then I can read prayers and chants.  He said, even if I don’t know what the words mean, there is merit in doing that.

Offline nelisjan

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Re: Meeting a Rimpoche
« Reply #6 on: October 30, 2018, 12:46:07 am »
I hear this often about there being merit in recitation of ancient scriptures. I've yet to learn any of the ancient languages, be it Tibetan, Pali or Sanskrit. How many of you have any experience of change after recitations and chants? Thanks for indulging my curiosity  :namaste:

Offline Chaz

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Re: Meeting a Rimpoche
« Reply #7 on: October 30, 2018, 06:17:04 am »
I hear this often about there being merit in recitation of ancient scriptures. I've yet to learn any of the ancient languages, be it Tibetan, Pali or Sanskrit. How many of you have any experience of change after recitations and chants? Thanks for indulging my curiosity  :namaste:

I've done many chants and sadhanas in Tibetan and English.  While there is accumulation of merit and learning from these practices, I think the only "change" that's experienced is time.  There's really nothing magical or extraordinary in the performance of these practices.  They're spoken meditation.  If there's anything changing, it's very, very subtle. 

Looking for change kinda misses the point.

Offline Rasputin

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Re: Meeting a Rimpoche
« Reply #8 on: October 30, 2018, 09:31:00 am »
I prefer to recite the chants and mantras in English as affirmations.

Offline Chaz

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Re: Meeting a Rimpoche
« Reply #9 on: October 30, 2018, 11:37:56 am »
I prefer to recite the chants and mantras in English as affirmations.

I like English because I'm lazy.

However,. Many chants are meant to be sung and the traditional  Melody doesn't always work with English, so I do those in Tibetan.

Offline Gibbon

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Re: Meeting a Rimpoche
« Reply #10 on: November 01, 2018, 09:48:38 am »
The actual words spoken and sung by beings who became realized through these practices definitely carry a blessing.  However, chanting in Tibetan can quickly degenerate into gibberish if you cannot follow the meaning. 

Maybe the best path is to use English mostly and sometimes add a little Tibetan for that additional injection of blessing.  This is what the Tibetans did, while translating Indian texts they kept the mantras in Sanskrit.  Then they started producing original works in their own language reflecting their realization, and thus the Dharma was fully transmitted into Tibet.

Offline Chaz

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Re: Meeting a Rimpoche
« Reply #11 on: November 01, 2018, 09:52:57 am »
The actual words spoken and sung by beings who became realized through these practices definitely carry a blessing.  However, chanting in Tibetan can quickly degenerate into gibberish if you cannot follow the meaning. 

That's for sure.

I used to get together with a Green Tara practice group and the recited/sang the sadhana liturgyin Tibetan. I'd get lost after a couple pages.  The text they used had Tibetan script, a phonetic spelling and English, which actually made it worse.  It got easier with time, but until it did, it was very frustrating.

 


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