Author Topic: Philosophical Questions of a Beginner  (Read 2825 times)

Offline Alexey

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Re: Philosophical Questions of a Beginner
« Reply #30 on: July 28, 2013, 08:57:30 am »
Wholesome intentions are not abandoned after the second Jhana, but during the second Jhana(while meditating) would be my take on that, I've never met a person that impressed me as being enlightened that didn't seem to have wholesome intentions.

One of the biggest mistakes I see with people reading the scripture is they instantly assume whatever is being said not only applies to meditation but everyday life as well, often, it seems to me this is not the case, the Buddha was speaking about letting go of all attachments(for example) during meditation, not everyday life.(where one might try to get rid of only most attachments)

Take the five agreaggates, the Buddha seems to be saying completely ignore all their input, BUT THIS MEANS DURING MEDITATION, not everyday life, how could you posssibly stop using your eyes to see and still drive a car. I'm not saying the five aggregates are only not your self during meditation. But rather the teachings that the Five aggreagates are MARA the evil one and have to be destroyed, DURING MEDITATION, obviously its the nature of existence and the things we perceive with our senses that are very deceptive and not to be taken seriously in everyday life, but destroying them completely has to be a meditation technique, not advice for everyday living, otherwise we'd have a lot of blind, silent, deaf monks with colostomy bags and catheters being spoon fed, because they'd destroyed MARA, the 5 agreggates.
I not said that "after 2nd jhana" i said "in 2nd jhana". :namaste:

In this sutta Buddha speaks about wholsome and unwholsome habits/intentions through 4NT method (cause, cessation, way).

2nd jhana is taught by him as "sessation of wholsome intentions", and about 4 Right Strivings as the way of cessation of wholsome/unwholsome intentions until there is no attainmenet of fruit.
Also Budda dont say that Arahant stop wholsome actions (he can not do unwholsome actions because of his liberation, so he do only wholsome actions) but there is no self-identification with these actions and no wholsome intentions. Arahant have no intentions at all )

Actualy to live 5 khandhas as anatta, see them as "not your self", with no self-identifying with them, to see them as they actualy are - one ractitioner have to develop 4 satipatthanas (4 bases of mindfulness) : body as body, feelings as feelings, mind as mind, mind-objects as mind-objects. When 4 satipatthanas are fully developed there is no problem with 5 khandhas as "not your self" not only in meditation, but in each moment.
Buddha teach as that satipatthana have to be developped in every position or action, when one sit, stand, lay, walk, eat, defecate etc. etc.

There is no problem in suttas, believe me. ,)
 :Approval:

With metta.  :namaste:
« Last Edit: July 28, 2013, 09:01:39 am by Alexey »
You can ask your question) - http://ask.fm/AlekseyKaverin

Suffering - should be understood
Origin of suffering - should be abandoned
Cessation of suffering - should be realised
The way leadding to cessation of suffering - should be developed

Offline BlueSky

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Re: Philosophical Questions of a Beginner
« Reply #31 on: July 28, 2013, 07:00:17 pm »
Quote from: Amishrockstar
My second question is really more of a statement about a doctrine I'm not comfortable with in Buddhism, and maybe you all have an insight to share. We, as humans, tend to have a deep sense of certain actions being objectively wrong (rape, murder, etc), yet Buddhism teaches that actions are either "skillful" or "unskillful," so how can we live as a Buddhist when we seem to have an inner sense of objective morality? In other words, there seems to be no basis for morality in Buddhism, so there's no objective way to say that rape is wrong --even though we really DO want to say that.

Thank you for taking the time to read my questions, and I hope that what I've asked is clearly stated.

Matthew

 :dharma:

Will you say the mountain has no moral when the explosion kills millions of people?

Will you say water has no moral, when tsunami kills millions of people?
Enlightenment is simply the clearing away of misunderstanding. When mistaken thinking is gone, liberation has happened. (Gampopa)


When we verbally indicate a thing as 'this' or 'that', our words, like rabbits's horns, are hollow names, mere fictive imputation upon what does not exist. (Longchenpa)

Offline former monk john

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Re: Philosophical Questions of a Beginner
« Reply #32 on: July 28, 2013, 10:01:31 pm »
Buddhism is  a very moral religion, grounded in a strong sense of ethics, Morality and ethics in Buddhism are based on the law of cause and effect, Karma, immorality, the idea that there is no right or wrong and that following Buddhist precepts is unimportant or not needed, Is an entirely western idea, partly derived from Atheism,and paganism and has nothing whatsoever to do with traditional Asian Buddhism
to me, the signs of a successful practice are happiness and a cessation of suffering, buddhism often gives me this; not all the answers.

Offline Spiny Norman

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Re: Philosophical Questions of a Beginner
« Reply #33 on: July 29, 2013, 01:25:13 am »
....the idea that there is no right or wrong and that following Buddhist precepts is unimportant or not needed, Is an entirely western idea, partly derived from Atheism,and paganism and has nothing whatsoever to do with traditional Asian Buddhism

I don't think it's the fault of atheism or paganism.  I think it's more like some strains of Vajryana question the need for moral "rules".

Offline former monk john

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Re: Philosophical Questions of a Beginner
« Reply #34 on: July 29, 2013, 02:12:56 am »
Paganism, Bon religion, 1/2 mixed in with "Buddhism" in Tibet, they are not all good guys, some of them are just evil
to me, the signs of a successful practice are happiness and a cessation of suffering, buddhism often gives me this; not all the answers.

Offline Ananda10

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Re: Philosophical Questions of a Beginner
« Reply #35 on: May 15, 2014, 08:17:07 am »
I'm not sure if these questions belong here, and if not, I hope they will be moved to the right section of the forum.

I would not quite consider myself a Buddhist although I have gone back-and-forth between my Protestant upbringing and Buddhism since my early teens.

As I've found myself listening to Buddhist lectures and documentaries online a lot lately, there have been multiple questions that have arisen, and I thought I'd post a couple of them here to get some feedback.

My first question has to do with the impersonal nature of the universe according to Buddhism. If the Buddhist understanding of there being no personal creator, God, and that all that exists may just stretch back forever without end (multiple lifetimes and karmic ups and downs), then where does personhood come from? In other words, just as a creationist might ask an evolutionist, "How do you get something out of nothing?" My question is, "How do you get our personal nature (emotion, identity, thought, volition, etc) out of a non-personal universe (from a Buddhist perspective)?

My second question is really more of a statement about a doctrine I'm not comfortable with in Buddhism, and maybe you all have an insight to share. We, as humans, tend to have a deep sense of certain actions being objectively wrong (rape, murder, etc), yet Buddhism teaches that actions are either "skillful" or "unskillful," so how can we live as a Buddhist when we seem to have an inner sense of objective morality? In other words, there seems to be no basis for morality in Buddhism, so there's no objective way to say that rape is wrong --even though we really DO want to say that.

Thank you for taking the time to read my questions, and I hope that what I've asked is clearly stated.

Matthew

 :dharma:

Getting something out nothing indicates an aquired self. The 5 aggregates affected by clinging are impermanent. So we can get an advanced discussion of impermanence this way.

In Buddhism we have the 5 precepts: abstaining from killing, abstaining from stealing, abstaining from sexual misconduct, abstaining from false speech, and abstaining from intoxicating drink and drug causing heedlessness and infatuation.

 


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