Author Topic: Question on a subject for Theravadan view based on their knowledge  (Read 1190 times)

sahaja

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Question on a subject for Theravadan view based on their knowledge
« on: September 17, 2013, 03:56:31 pm »


Sometimes it's just so much quicker to find an expert and ask. Who would be most familiar with Teachings of the Gautama Buddha, but the scholars. Ask the Theravadans about this, because i just don't know what  to make of it, especially the date. This, i assume since the reference is simply Buddha, must therefore refer to him. Teaching Tantra?. About Shambhala?
Is there any mention of this that anyone knows of ?

3 spins of the wheel?  3 different appearances at 3 different times and 3 different names perhaps? But they should come after not before attaining buddhahood and usually different names are stated. I have not heard this said of Gautama Buddha. There are stretches and gaps within Vajrayana lineage histories _But this??? What would be a Theravadan view of this?

Re: Where is Shambhala?
(FreeSangha - Buddhist Forum » Schools of Buddhism » Vajrayana » The Tibetan Connection (General) » Where is Shambhala?
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« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2013, 03:27:37 am »
By namumahaparinirvanasvaha

http://www.berzinarchives.com/web/en/archives/study/islam/kalachakra_islam/holy_wars_buddhism_islam_myth_shamb/holy_war_buddhism_islam_shambhala_short.html

Quote:
 
The Legend of Shambhala
According to tradition, Buddha taught The Kalachakra Tantra in Andhra, South India, in 880 BCE, to the visiting King of Shambhala, Suchandra, and his entourage..........



http://www.freesangha.com/forums/the-tibetan-connection-(general)/re-pure-land-practices-why/
Where is Shambhala?
« Last Edit: September 17, 2013, 04:01:26 pm by sahaja »

Offline t

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Re: Question on a subject for Theravadan view based on their knowledge
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2013, 06:37:54 pm »
Short answer: No spin, no Shambala.
Only this in summary:
As before, so now I proclaim just suffering and the ceasing of suffering Anuraadho Sutta

Offline Dmytro

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Re: Question on a subject for Theravadan view based on their knowledge
« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2013, 09:55:28 pm »
Hi Sahaja,

The Legend of Shambhala
According to tradition, Buddha taught The Kalachakra Tantra in Andhra, South India, in 880 BCE, to the visiting King of Shambhala, Suchandra, and his entourage..........



There may be a bit of truth in this - there was a community of monks in Andhra which was composing texts.

"According to the Theravādin Nikāyasaṅgraha, the Ratnakūṭa Sūtra was composed by the "Andhakas", meaning the Mahāsāṃghika Caitika schools of the Āndhra region."

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mah%C4%81ratnak%C5%AB%E1%B9%ADa_S%C5%ABtra

The earliest form of the word "Shambhala" - "Sambhala" - seems to have been taken from Kalki-purana:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kalki#Birth

Offline t

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Re: Question on a subject for Theravadan view based on their knowledge
« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2013, 12:53:41 am »
Dmytro, if I may ask...
 
The Jewel Heap Sutra, being one of the oldest Mahayana compositions, collection of 49 Sutra texts have nothing to do with the later development of the Kalacakra Tantra text but more about providing various Sutrayana stuff which is believed by scholars to have influenced Nagarjuna's Madhyamaka teaching. 

And a commentary from the Theravadins on its Mahasamghika rival origins have what relation to the Kalacakra text per se? I doubt the Mahasamghika gang has even heard about it, much less composed it...

Offline Dmytro

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Re: Question on a subject for Theravadan view based on their knowledge
« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2013, 01:04:29 pm »
The Jewel Heap Sutra, being one of the oldest Mahayana compositions, collection of 49 Sutra texts have nothing to do with the later development of the Kalacakra Tantra text but more about providing various Sutrayana stuff which is believed by scholars to have influenced Nagarjuna's Madhyamaka teaching.

Yes, Ratnakuta sutra is a relatively early text. It belongs to a group of "Vaipulya" sutras. I am going to make a separate post on Vetulla/Vaipulya. 

Quote
And a commentary from the Theravadins on its Mahasamghika rival origins have what relation to the Kalacakra text per se? I doubt the Mahasamghika gang has even heard about it, much less composed it...

The relation is through the mention of Andhra.

Offline Ananda10

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Re: Question on a subject for Theravadan view based on their knowledge
« Reply #5 on: May 15, 2014, 07:42:59 am »


3 spins of the wheel?  3 different appearances at 3 different times and 3 different names perhaps?

The 3 most recent Samma Sambuddha's are Konagamana, Kassapa, and Gotama who each set in motion the unsurpassed wheel of the dhamma.

Lord Buddha Vipassi appeared 91 aeons before.

Lord Buddha Sikhi appeared 31 aeons before.

Lord Buddha Kakusandha appeared in this aeon.

There were 3 Samma Sambuddhas from the Kondanna family group.

There were 3 Samma Sambuddhas from the Kassapa family group.

There was 1 Samma Sambuddha from the Gotama family group.

 


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