Author Topic: Theravada Buddhism mired in faithlessness, egoism, fundamentalism & rebellion  (Read 2592 times)

Offline sdjeff1

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As someone who is going it alone, (not out of choice) I can see how easy it is to become mired in these things described by the OP. Please keep in mind I'm pretty much a beginner.

In reading the suttas it's essential to remember that Pali doesn't always translate to English directly. Some do seem contradictory but upon further study they mostly square. Taking it to the cushion also helps. So does YouTube and other sites. There are some thing I don't follow but they are mostly monastic rules or teachings I can't follow due to health reasons such as nutriment (I require 6 meals a day due to metabolic issues) and prostration (bad back).

My point is that I try to keep enough discernment to avoid these things described by the OP. Right now I'm concentrating on the basics. four Noble Truths, Noble Eightfold Path and Dependent Origination. I'm doing Samantha meditation and reading about 600 pages on Vipassana. I'm not concentrating on terms like stream-entry or Jhanas yet. I think it would take an experienced teacher to guide me through such things.

Back to the Suttas, It's also easy as a beginner to really beat your head against the wall because a lot of them seem to describe one who is a lot further along than myself. why am I not like that? Have I really arrived at the right Dhamma?  Why am I not getting this? and so on. Again, I take it to the cushion or study it further or asking questions here. Best I can do.

I've been pointed to a lot of great resources and I do use them.

A beginning Loners take.
It's easier to push the cart rather than thinking of pushing the cart.
-anonymous monk

To be normal is the ideal aim of the unsuccessful.
-CG Jung

Offline Lobster

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Whenever I went to my uncles house, I dug up and read his book on Buddhism

What the Buddha Taught, by Dr Walpola Rahula
He was a practicing Catholic but this was my introduction.

It has a simple enough for a child intro to theravadin buddhism
Sometimes it takes years and several changes in circumstance to realise the profundity in even the simplest doctrine.

Patience is an attribute one can not rush, a bit like experience.
Rapid progress does not produce the best wine. :om:



Offline sdjeff1

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Patience is an attribute one can not rush, a bit like experience.
Rapid progress does not produce the best wine. :om:

Quite true. Learned that the hard way in the beginning. Still learning.
It's easier to push the cart rather than thinking of pushing the cart.
-anonymous monk

To be normal is the ideal aim of the unsuccessful.
-CG Jung

Offline Spiny Norman

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for example, there are Buddhists who assert a here-&-now functioning of Dependent Origination due to their meditative insight. thus, that they reject the 3-lifetimes explanation of Dependent Origination is forgiveable & acceptable because their view is based on a actual insight. insight, for them, has precedence over speculation

In my experience such people make these assertions because of an aversion to the idea of rebirth.  They ignore what is described in the suttas and attempt to impose a psychological interpretation of Dependent Origination. 

Offline sdjeff1

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for example, there are Buddhists who assert a here-&-now functioning of Dependent Origination due to their meditative insight. thus, that they reject the 3-lifetimes explanation of Dependent Origination is forgiveable & acceptable because their view is based on a actual insight. insight, for them, has precedence over speculation

In my experience such people make these assertions because of an aversion to the idea of rebirth.  They ignore what is described in the suttas and attempt to impose a psychological interpretation of Dependent Origination. 

Yes I did this at first. I couldn't accept the idea of rebirth (a remnant of my christian background) cause in a way I still wanted to go to heaven, even though I grappled severely with questions over the existence of God  and what kind of god it was. Rebirth was really my only hang-up and why I never became a Buddhist years ago. Even though I was reading Buddhist books. Kinda silly now that I look back on it. Now all I'm hoping for is a fortunate rebirth. Got a long way to go yet.
It's easier to push the cart rather than thinking of pushing the cart.
-anonymous monk

To be normal is the ideal aim of the unsuccessful.
-CG Jung

 


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