Author Topic: A quote from Zen Master Daikaku  (Read 2226 times)

Offline Quiet Heart

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A quote from Zen Master Daikaku
« on: March 22, 2011, 10:22:38 pm »
The following quote is from a monthly newsletter called  "The Flatbed Sutra of Louie Wing" which I subscribe to.
The comments in parentheses() are mine, and are my attempt at adding to the understanding of the tezt.
(you may agree or disagree...you're free to do so...as you wish)

Zen Master Daikaku
(1213-1278)

(Although it is said) It takes three incalculable eons to attain buddhahood by accumulating virtue and good qualities,
but if you practice the way of unity of cause and effect (the study and practice of Zen), you (may) realize buddhahood
in one lifetime.
Someone who illumines his own mind (by study and practice) and awakens to his/(her) real nature  (their original inherent Buddha
nature) sees that himself/(herself) is originally Buddha,(their original nature is the Buddha nature)
(and they are) not now (only) attaining buddhahood for the first time.
(Question)
"Do those who realize buddhahood by seeing reality not depend on cause and effect?
"Should they not (also) cultivate virtue?"
(Answer)
Although those who realize buddhahood by seeing their true nature may cultivate virtue, they do it for others' benefit, not for
(their own) rewards. Because they teach and transform sentient beings, they (must) teach cause and effect; (that being the nature
of the human mind)
(but) because they know they have no personal gain, they do not depend on merit-they have no mind at all. (i.e. they do not pick
or choose by showing any preference for one thing over another.)

Daikaku's Treatise on Meditation, The Original Face, p. 24,
(translation by) Thomas Cleary
 
 :wacky:

Offline catmoon

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Re: A quote from Zen Master Daikaku
« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2011, 10:30:44 pm »
"Not attaining Buddhahood for the first time"?

Now i wonder what is meant by that.
Sergeant Schultz was onto something.

Offline J. McKenna

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Re: A quote from Zen Master Daikaku
« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2011, 06:40:04 pm »
Perhaps .....
 
If at first you don't succeed, try, try again. Then quit. There's no point in being a damn fool about it. -- W. C. Fields
...i found there was no "i" anywhere.....

Offline Quiet Heart

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Re: A quote from Zen Master Daikaku
« Reply #3 on: March 25, 2011, 12:45:37 am »
 :cheesy:

regarding:
(and they are) not now (only) attaining buddhahood for the first time.

Sorry if my feeble attempt to make things "clearer" (the parentheses part) confused people.

Think of  "buddhahood" (which is from the original translation) as a code-name for 'enlightenmen", Satori,  or a deep understanding.
That's why I left in uncapitalised .....as buddhahood not Buddhahood.

I believe Daikaku would have probably said that the person's true nature was in fact their original Buddha nature and therefore nothing was gained or obtained...they simply came to the true realization of that already existing state.

Something like a person who wakes from a long sleep, and douses their face with cold water to "wash the sleep out" of their eyes.
 :wacky:

Offline J. McKenna

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Re: A quote from Zen Master Daikaku
« Reply #4 on: March 25, 2011, 08:48:15 am »
Think of  "buddhahood" (which is from the original translation) as a code-name for 'enlightenmen", Satori,  or a deep understanding.
.......
 
....  the person's true nature was in fact their original Buddha nature and therefore nothing was gained or obtained...they simply came to the true realization of that already existing state.
 
.........
 
Something like a person who wakes from a long sleep, and douses their face with cold water to "wash the sleep out" of their eyes.

Absolutely, positively, inarguably, 100% correct!!  :jinsyx:   :clap:
 
 
How simple a truth, yet how few come to recognize it ....  =((   :shh:
...i found there was no "i" anywhere.....

Offline catmoon

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Re: A quote from Zen Master Daikaku
« Reply #5 on: March 25, 2011, 01:59:43 pm »
Think of  "buddhahood" (which is from the original translation) as a code-name for 'enlightenmen", Satori,  or a deep understanding.
.......
 
....  the person's true nature was in fact their original Buddha nature and therefore nothing was gained or obtained...they simply came to the true realization of that already existing state.
 
.........
 
Something like a person who wakes from a long sleep, and douses their face with cold water to "wash the sleep out" of their eyes.

Absolutely, positively, inarguably, 100% correct!!  :jinsyx:   :clap:

Inarguable? What if one were to assert the the attainment of enlightenment, satori or whatever IS the attainment of Buddhahood and that's just what Budhha did?
 
 
Sergeant Schultz was onto something.

Offline J. McKenna

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Re: A quote from Zen Master Daikaku
« Reply #6 on: March 25, 2011, 02:05:40 pm »
Po-tay-toe, po-tah-toe ....
 
Humans have many names for the exact same thing. Call it True Self, Heaven, Godhead, or Schickleburger ....
...i found there was no "i" anywhere.....

Offline Lobster

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Re: A quote from Zen Master Daikaku
« Reply #7 on: January 27, 2012, 03:55:44 am »
Quote
Although those who realize buddhahood by seeing their true nature may cultivate virtue, they do it for others' benefit, not for
(their own) rewards.
:fu:
My teacher most clearly would be aligned with the Pratyekabuddha
in other words without lineage or exoteric teachings.
The difficulty is such people may have an agenda and behaviour that is almost incomprehensible to most of us.
They may not appear virtuous at all. However meeting and interacting on even
a mundane level may have far reaching consequences.
This is why realization or waking up is of such prime importance.
The blind leading the blind is no substitute.
Virtue and its nature changes import and emphasis many times . . .

Personally I find we have an inner Buddha, what some call a guardian Angel.
Listen to that. It will serve you well.

 . . . what's that Buddha? . . . be kind to the fish?
Got ya. Will do my best.  <3

 


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