Author Topic: Homesick from Master Seung Sahn (and saying hello to everyone and i'm back)  (Read 1077 times)

Offline ZenFred

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"ONE DAY, a bookish young student of Zen Master Seung Sahn was sitting at the Providence Zen Center, diligently devouring a text, when suddenly, he felt someone patting him lightly on the shoulder. Startled, he looked back to see that the Zen master had come up quietly behind him.
“You’re homesick, very homesick . . .” the Zen master said, continuing to pat him gently, his round face filled with soft compassion.
But this speech startled the student more than his teacher’s sudden appearance. “I do not miss my home, or my family,” he thought to himself. “How could he think I am homesick for those things?”
Just as he thought this, the Zen master continued, “. . . homesick for your original home.”
Shocked at such recognition of the sadness in his mind, the student bowed quietly.”

Excerpt From: Zen Master Seung Sahn. “Wanting Enlightenment Is a Big Mistake.” Shambhala Publications.

I am very homesick :) I pray that Avalokiteśvara shows me her endless compassion.

I hope everyone is well. I passed my boards and started a new job so coming back to the forums after several months away.

Gassho,
 :namaste:

Offline Merwin

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What is meant by "your original home"?

Offline ZenFred

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Merwin,

  Hmmm... Hope you don't mind me answering that with another quote.

"We end up with the moonlight , a symbol of the oneness of practice and realization. We end up with Shikantaza, being already home as we start our journey, for there is nowhere else to be. Just being is our home. So the seeking never ceases, it is the action through which we turn the Dharma wheel, it is this continous practice. Nowhere to go, nobody who travels, to destination to reach, just the full joy of being and unfolding this being-time now."
-Master Tiagu, soto zen master from Treeleaf, while discussing the oxherding pictures.

Gassho

Offline Merwin

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Merwin,

  Hmmm... Hope you don't mind me answering that with another quote.

"We end up with the moonlight , a symbol of the oneness of practice and realization. We end up with Shikantaza, being already home as we start our journey, for there is nowhere else to be. Just being is our home. So the seeking never ceases, it is the action through which we turn the Dharma wheel, it is this continous practice. Nowhere to go, nobody who travels, to destination to reach, just the full joy of being and unfolding this being-time now."
-Master Tiagu, soto zen master from Treeleaf, while discussing the oxherding pictures.

Gassho

No, I don't mind at all. Thank you for the explanation, I think I get it now.
Just another look on things: Is "being homesick for your original home" not a form of attachment to being mindful? Not saying this is a bad thing. I've heard a monk say that if you have to be attached to something, let it be meditation. Because meditating will then help you get rid of attachments, making it some kind of negative feedback loop.

Offline ZenFred

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Merwin,

  Yes, I agree that we need to be vigilant to harmful attachments in our practice. They are all too abundant and often subtle. I think you posted before, couldn't find the thread again, about not being attached to the calm and serenity you experience because you will be frustrated when it isn't reached and it will become a false measure of your "success" in meditation. For me, it's been a lot of recognizing attachments in my practice particularly with identifying with this school or that or "buddhism" in general. Attachments to seeking a perfect teacher, perfect sangha and on and on.

But then again, as you suggest, maybe some attachment/desire is needed. We talk of desiring or loving the dharma. I had a conversation with Dharmakara here about why we should want to practice if we shouldn't be in for relaxation, or for the prestige and ambition of being "enlightened." Zen sometimes says Zen isn't good for anything, but why then bother with it?! The answer for me is relief from my suffering. I don't want to suffer. So I'm homesick for that refuge, the moments of insight were all good and bad drop away, for the comfort of the sangha here and elsewhere, for the promises and of the dharma that there is a way out.

What do you think? We are you along this rarely traveled pathless path?

Gassho -Fred

 


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