Author Topic: Publishing the Sutras  (Read 2618 times)

Offline Quiet Heart

  • Member
  • Posts: 129
  • In Quietness is the beginning of all things.
    • View Profile
Publishing the Sutras
« on: January 03, 2010, 04:21:56 pm »
 :dharma:
Publishing the Sutras

Tetsugen, a devotee of Zen in Japan, decided to publish the sutras, which at that time were available only in Chinese. The books were to be printed with wood blocks in an edition of seven thousand copies, a tremendous, and costly undertaking.
Tetsugen began by traveling and collecting donations for this purpose. A few sympathizers would give him a hundred pieces of gold, but most of the time he received only small coins. He thanked each donor with equal gratitude. After ten years Tetsugen had enough money to begin his task.
It happened that at that time the Uji River overflowed. Famine followed. Tetsugen took the funds he had collected for the books and spent them to save others from starvation. Then he began again his work of collecting.
Several years afterwards an epidemic spread over the country. Tetsugen again gave away what he had collected, to help his people.
For a third time he started his work, and after twenty years his wish was fulfilled. The hand carved printing blocks which produced the first edition of sutras can be seen today in the Obaku monastery in Kyoto.

The Japanese tell their children that Tetsugen made three sets of sutras, but that the first two invisible sets surpass even the last.
 :namaste:

Offline Shi Hong Yang

  • Peace inside ripples out
  • Member
  • Posts: 180
  • Vinaya Bhikshuni translator of Mahayana Tripitaka
    • View Profile
    • Sangha Walks
Re: Publishing the Sutras
« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2010, 05:40:44 pm »
Quiet Heart your publishing beautiful works in this forum.  Can you please provide a link so those of us who wish to may read more?

Or maybe just a reference to the source ifyou do not have them on hand.  They are lovely enough to submit to th library section if you have online sources.
Chinese Buddhism is the oldest form of Buddhism in the USA, in 2013 it is 161 years old.  The first Buddhist temples were built in California in 1952 & 1854. Second oldest is Korean in 1900 and Japanese in 1902 both in Hawaii.

Offline retrofuturist

  • Member
  • Posts: 388
    • View Profile
    • Dhamma Wheel (Theravada forum)
Re: Publishing the Sutras
« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2010, 09:12:10 pm »
Greetings,

Does anyone know what sutras these would have been?

Are Chinese sutras (either Mahayana Sutras, or Agamas etc.) available online in English?

Now THAT would be useful!

Metta,
Retro. :)

Offline Shi Hong Yang

  • Peace inside ripples out
  • Member
  • Posts: 180
  • Vinaya Bhikshuni translator of Mahayana Tripitaka
    • View Profile
    • Sangha Walks
Re: Publishing the Sutras
« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2010, 04:21:04 pm »
www.cbeta.org
Chinese Buddhist Electronic Text Association

It is the Taisho Tripitaka.

http://www4.bayarea.net/~mtlee/
Mahayana Buddhist Sutras in English

http://www.e-sangha.com/alphone/tripitaka.htm
Aphone's link to Tripitaka (e-sangha)  this is a working link

I post these and more in the Library as well.
Chinese Buddhism is the oldest form of Buddhism in the USA, in 2013 it is 161 years old.  The first Buddhist temples were built in California in 1952 & 1854. Second oldest is Korean in 1900 and Japanese in 1902 both in Hawaii.


Offline eijo

  • Member
  • Posts: 11
    • View Profile
Re: Publishing the Sutras
« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2010, 11:46:41 pm »
Greetings,

Does anyone know what sutras these would have been?

Are Chinese sutras (either Mahayana Sutras, or Agamas etc.) available online in English?

Now THAT would be useful!

Metta,
Retro. :)

Hi Retro, they are the Chinese Tripitaka, of course including all Sutras, Abbhidharma, and Vinaya. Agama and Mahayana sutras are all included. The Tetsugen-edition 鐵眼版, or more formally the Obaku-ban Daizo-kyo 黃檗版大藏經, formed one of the bases of the Taisho edition, which was digitized by CBETA and SAT, so yes, they are all available online now. :) In Chinese.

Offline retrofuturist

  • Member
  • Posts: 388
    • View Profile
    • Dhamma Wheel (Theravada forum)
Re: Publishing the Sutras
« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2010, 06:21:51 pm »
Greetings Eijo,

In Chinese.

In an era when so many people know both Chinese and English, it surprises me that this is the extent of it.

I hope you are well - nice to see you here.

Metta,
Retro. :)

Offline Quiet Heart

  • Member
  • Posts: 129
  • In Quietness is the beginning of all things.
    • View Profile
Re: Publishing the Sutras
« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2010, 02:53:48 pm »
Quiet Heart your publishing beautiful works in this forum.  Can you please provide a link so those of us who wish to may read more?

Or maybe just a reference to the source ifyou do not have them on hand.  They are lovely enough to submit to th library section if you have online sources.

 ;D
The story is intended as a parable, a story teaching a lesson and making a point. It is probably at least partly a traditional teaching story. I wouldn't be sure of it's absolute historical validity.
However, here's something from Wikipedia to consider.

Tetsugen Doko
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Tetsugen Doko Religion Zen Buddhism
School Obaku
Personal
Born 1630
Higo Province, Japan
Died 1682
 
Senior posting
Title Zen Master
Tetsugen Dōkō (鉄眼道光 (1630 – 1682) was a Japanese Zen Master, and an important early leader of the Ōbaku school of Buddhism.
Tetsugen was born in the seventh year of the Kan'ei era (1630) in Higo Province. He became a priest of the Jodo Shinshu sect at the age of 13. When Ingen came to Japan, Tetsugen became his follower in the ÅŒbaku school.
In 1681,Tetsugen oversaw the production of the first complete woodcut edition (consisting of around 60,000 pieces) of the Chinese Buddhist sutras in Japan.
Tetsugen died at the age of 53 in the second year of the Tenna era (1682).
The anniversary of Tetsugen's birth is celebrated on January 1 in the Western calendar.


Information on Ingen

Ingen Ryuki (Chinese 隱元隆琦, Yinyuan Longqi) (Fuqing, Fujian, 1592 - Uji, 1673) was a Chinese Linji Chan Buddhist monk, poet, and calligrapher.

Ingen's father disappeared when he was five. At age 20, while searching for him, Ingen arrived at Mount Putuo off Zhejiang province, where he served tea to monks. At 28, after the death of his mother, he was ordained as a monk at his family temple - Wanfu Temple, Mount Huangbo, Fujian. Ingen's teachers there were Miyun Yuanwu and Feiyin Tongrong. In 1633 he received dharma transmission from the latter, and in 1637 served his first term as abbot. His second term as 33rd abbot of the temple began in 1646 and at this time he is credited with helping Mount Huangbo to develop in to a thriving Buddhist centre. In 1654, after repeated requests of Itsunen Shoyu he went to Nagasaki, Japan with around 30 monks and artisans, including his disciple Muyan, and founded the ÅŒbaku sect, establishing its head temple Mampuku-ji at Uji in 1661.

May 21, 1673 (Enpō 1, 5th day of the 4th month): The Chinese Buddhist teacher Ingen died in the Obaku Zen temple, Mampukuji at Uji.[1]


« Last Edit: January 14, 2010, 03:08:15 pm by Quiet Heart »

 


SimplePortal 2.3.3 © 2008-2010, SimplePortal