Author Topic: The Dhammapada in Zen—According to pudgala2  (Read 2583 times)

Offline pudgala2

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The Dhammapada in Zen—According to pudgala2
« on: May 31, 2013, 11:40:55 am »
QUOTE:
The Dhammapada:
Conquer the angry man by love.
Conquer the ill-natured man by goodness.
Conquer the miser with generosity.
Conquer the liar with truth.

The Dhammapada in Zen—according to pudgala2:
Release the angry man within and peace resides
Release the ill-natured man within and naturalness resides
Release the miser within and penness resides
Release the liar within and Truth resides

It's remarkable what happens when mind restrains the ego from
saving/benefiting/bothering/controlling/condemning others and starts
minding its own happiness by releasing the sentient beings within
that maintain and control the ego and generate a suffering self.

Awareness is intrinsically pure and cannot be controlled
because it has no sentient buttons to push.

Release suffering by NOT attending, supporting, and practicing it!

Walking in a field of diamonds playing with the rocks in their head!


pudgala2

Poetic justice—deserving to be the karmic character you habitually practice being—until YOU stop it.


Offline ground

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Re: The Dhammapada in Zen—According to pudgala2
« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2013, 12:30:39 pm »
Never mind. Just sit.  :fu:


Offline pudgala2

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Re: The Dhammapada in Zen—According to pudgala2
« Reply #3 on: May 31, 2013, 05:12:57 pm »
Thank you. Glad to see that cat has a bell on and hope he is neutered (or she is spayed). Feral and outside house cats are devastating the bird population!

Speaking of devastating house cats and prancing back on topic:



We are sentient beings if you please
We are sentient beings if you don't please
We are ancient residents of I AM .………
There are no finer kind than I Am*

*Image and jingle altered by pudgala2
from the movie Lady and the Tramp



pudgala2
« Last Edit: May 31, 2013, 05:15:08 pm by pudgala2 »

Poetic justice—deserving to be the karmic character you habitually practice being—until YOU stop it.


Offline Spiny Norman

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Re: The Dhammapada in Zen—According to pudgala2
« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2013, 02:17:24 am »
QUOTE:
The Dhammapada:
Conquer the angry man by love.
Conquer the ill-natured man by goodness.
Conquer the miser with generosity.
Conquer the liar with truth.

The Dhammapada in Zen—according to pudgala2:
Release the angry man within and peace resides
Release the ill-natured man within and naturalness resides
Release the miser within and penness resides
Release the liar within and Truth resides



I don't get it.  Could you explain what you mean by "release" - it sounds like indulging the anger?

Offline pudgala2

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Re: The Dhammapada in Zen—According to pudgala2
« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2013, 10:58:57 am »
QUOTE:
The Dhammapada:
Conquer the angry man by love.
Conquer the ill-natured man by goodness.
Conquer the miser with generosity.
Conquer the liar with truth.

The Dhammapada in Zen—according to pudgala2:
Release the angry man within and peace resides
Release the ill-natured man within and naturalness resides
Release the miser within and penness resides
Release the liar within and Truth resides



I don't get it.  Could you explain what you mean by "release" - it sounds like indulging the anger?


When one belches, gas is released from the stomach through the mouth.
One has delivered, released, let go of, surrendered the pressure.
Plop, plop, fizz, fizz, oh what a relief it is!

When one farts, gas is released from the rectum through the anus.
One has delivered, released, let go of, surrendered the pressure.
My farts are interesting and funny. Others' farts are disgusting!

Sentient beings are egotistical mental pressures (beliefs, etc.,). Anger, meanness,
hoarding, and lying are names for some of these inner mental processes that
stress or stink up or pressure the mind. Anger stinks! Meanness stinks! Lying stinks!
These processes are delivered, released, let go of, surrendered in zazen.

The ego identifies itself with its sentient processes and can't let go of its own self
agitation because it is addicted to it. Zazen properly practiced releases the
emotional pressure/stress that sentient beings (beliefs, opinions, attitudes, etc.,)
generate in the mind and gas up the ego.

Correctly sitting in zazen mind actually sees these addictive processes forming
and the Truth of the Origin of Suffering is realized by the attentive mind.

Insight is the capacity to gain an accurate and deep intuitive understanding of a person or thing.
Insight is a new understanding by a mentally ill person of the causes of their disorder.
Insight into the nature of sentient beings is the be all and end all of the BuddhaDharma.

Zazen is the proving ground of your focused understanding—just sitting and being TOTALLY PRESENT.
Prajna is like a laser cannon zapping ANYTHING that tries to capture your attention—YOU are the CAPTAIN.



I am that I am and will have no sentient beings before me.

When you knw you know you know you knw
and there's simply no way of ever unknowing.

The practical practice of the Buddhas is the only true way ut of suffering.
Beliefs always keep you stuck in the dark—even burning beliefs in the BuddhaDharma!

An Enlightened fart blew out the burning candle
Driving all sentient beings from the zend

BURNING DARKNESS GONE
(absence of a never was)
NIRVANA!

   
pudgala2

Poetic justice—deserving to be the karmic character you habitually practice being—until YOU stop it.


Offline ground

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Re: The Dhammapada in Zen—According to pudgala2
« Reply #6 on: June 04, 2013, 12:34:47 pm »
...
When one farts, gas is released from the rectum through the anus.
One has delivered, released, let go of, surrendered the pressure.
My farts are interesting and funny. Others' farts are disgusting!
...
When brain farts, thoughts arise, accompanied by bodily impulses that make fingers type or throats blurt out sounds.

Never mind. Just sit.  :fu:

Offline songhill

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Re: The Dhammapada in Zen—According to pudgala2
« Reply #7 on: June 04, 2013, 01:02:03 pm »
As the honey and also the milk-drink were flatulent, a flatulence arose in the Lord ~ Catusparisat Sutra (P.S. Sakra cured the Buddha's flatulence with haritaki-fruits.)

Offline Spiny Norman

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Re: The Dhammapada in Zen—According to pudgala2
« Reply #8 on: June 05, 2013, 01:36:34 am »
I don't get it.  Could you explain what you mean by "release" - it sounds like indulging the anger?

When one belches, gas is released from the stomach through the mouth.
One has delivered, released, let go of, surrendered the pressure.
Plop, plop, fizz, fizz, oh what a relief it is!

It sounds like you're suggesting that anger should be let out on a regular basis - is that what you mean?

Offline nettles

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Re: The Dhammapada in Zen—According to pudgala2
« Reply #9 on: June 05, 2013, 10:50:31 am »


There was once a zen monk whose master instructed him to go out into the world with nothing but his robe and begging bowl until he had dissolved his ego to the point where he was no longer blown and buffeted by the winds of praise and blame. The student set out in earnest, walking on foot, begging for his meals and lodgings. He wandered for 300 miles and eventually came to rest in a small village where they had no monk or temple. He built himself a small hut where he meditated and ministered to the villagers for 10 years. After ten years, he finally felt he had dissolved his ego completely and was free from being blown and buffeted by the winds of praise and blame. He wrote a poem about it and sent it to his master to celebrate his success.

Upon receiving the note, the master smiled and wrote “fart fart” on the bottom, and gave it back to the village messenger to be returned.

When the monk received the note he was furious. How could his master so belittle the accomplishments of the past ten years? He set out on foot and travelled to see his old master himself. When he arrived and was granted audience, he demanded to know what his master had meant. His master replied, “In your poem, you tell me that you are free from being blown and buffeted by the winds of praise and blame, but two little farts blew you 300 miles.”


 :teehee:

Offline ground

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Re: The Dhammapada in Zen—According to pudgala2
« Reply #10 on: June 05, 2013, 11:12:59 am »
... His master replied, “In your poem, you tell me that you are free from being blown and buffeted by the winds of praise and blame, but two little farts blew you 300 miles.”


 :teehee:
Brain farts have tremenduous power, their impulses may carry across significant distances, be it 300 miles or the way to heaven or the way to hell.  :fu:

Offline Spiny Norman

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Re: The Dhammapada in Zen—According to pudgala2
« Reply #11 on: June 06, 2013, 07:02:40 am »
“In your poem, you tell me that you are free from being blown and buffeted by the winds of praise and blame, but two little farts blew you 300 miles.”

This is quite a nice story. :)

Offline pudgala2

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Re: The Dhammapada in Zen—According to pudgala2
« Reply #12 on: June 07, 2013, 04:16:53 pm »
There was once a zen monk whose master instructed him to go out into the world with nothing but his robe and begging bowl until he had dissolved his ego to the point where he was no longer blown and buffeted by the winds of praise and blame. The student set out in earnest, walking on foot, begging for his meals and lodgings. He wandered for 300 miles and eventually came to rest in a small village where they had no monk or temple. He built himself a small hut where he meditated and ministered to the villagers for 10 years. After ten years, he finally felt he had dissolved his ego completely and was free from being blown and buffeted by the winds of praise and blame. He wrote a poem about it and sent it to his master to celebrate his success.

The red sentence above is a sentient being—a self delusion—a mentally generated belief derived from a feeling of accomplishment. A prolonged immature need to impress others, seek fame, seek approval from others, or accomplish something is a mental disease cultivated in all cultures—without it cultures would fall away. When there is no ego what needs to be done gets done or doesn't get done and that's the end of it. Most of the time it is best not to do anything and in zazen the ego is actually undone. The presence of an authentic Zen master accelerates this process of undoing.

Sentient beings are mental entities such as beliefs, opinions, attitudes, perceptions, desires, moods, values, prejudices, convictions, assumptions, preconceptions, biases, habit patterns, dispositions, sentiments, judgments, addictions, impulses, compulsions, compunctions, obsessions, scruples, delusions, views, concepts, thoughts, ideas, etc., that are emotionally identified with and encapsulated in an ego. They are mentally felt to be valid and real to the ego. "I am what I feel/experience" is the cry of the ego—the artificial sense of self construction.

When the egotistical sentient feeler is gone nothing is felt because the feeler is gone. What is experience in Enlightenment is the absence of self agitation—an unconscious inner (virtual reality) process stops processing—the sentient button is gone.


Upon receiving the note, the master smiled and wrote “fart fart” on the bottom, and gave it back to the village messenger to be returned.

When the monk received the note he was furious. How could his master so belittle the [his] accomplishments of the past ten years?

How did this happen? How did the monk instantly create furiousness with the written words "fart fart"? He made himself furious because it happened to him. It didn't happen to us so we find the situation amusing.

Well it turns out that 100% of all non-psychotic egos all over the world who experience anger or become furious have a particularly nasty and insidious sentient being conditioned into them that forces them to be self agitating—they have no choice—the belief takes over instantly and they will even be forced to defend this irrational self defeating sentient being:

I believe it is normal and right to become upset [Furious] when things that are really important to me don't go the way they should.
*

It was this inner sentient being that put the words "How could his master so belittle the [my] accomplishments of the past ten years?" Now take a moment and ask yourself if you behave or react as if that belief is a hidden assumption in your mind instantly coming into play to process the passing moment. Someone insults you, rejects you, cuts you off on the road, gets ahead of you in a line—how do you respond, reply, react to the situation or are you so unconscious that an automatic sentient being takes over and you find yourself agitated and just accept it as normal—everybody does it! Sentient beings usually continue to rant in the mind over the indignity the ego is self-suffering from until a furious state is engendered.

So furious that,
He set out on foot and travelled to see his old master himself. When he arrived and was granted audience, he demanded to know what his master had meant. His master replied, “In your poem, you tell me that you are free from being blown and buffeted by the winds of praise and blame, but two little farts blew you 300 miles.”

 :teehee:


The final resolution of this story as to the effect of the master's remarks on the monk's mind is missing. Discovering the extraordinary lengths egos go through or suffer from because someone complimented or criticized them is the purpose of Insight meditation—zazen.

Zen masters employ skillful means to catalyze this process of undoing the ego. 

   
pudgala2

* Coping Better … Anywhere, Anytime by Maxie C. Maultsby, Jr., M.D.

Poetic justice—deserving to be the karmic character you habitually practice being—until YOU stop it.


Offline ground

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Re: The Dhammapada in Zen—According to pudgala2
« Reply #13 on: June 07, 2013, 07:51:36 pm »
Zen masters employ skillful means to catalyze this process of undoing the ego.   
No ego has ever been found by anybody. Therefore how could an ego be undone?
What is it that reads anecdote, generates idea "Zen masters" [plural, generalization] and pins its hope on its own idea "Zen masters"?

... purpose of Insight meditation—zazen.
Now where is the "Zen master" to reveal the baselessness of this idea?
  :fu:

Offline nettles

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Re: The Dhammapada in Zen—According to pudgala2
« Reply #14 on: June 08, 2013, 02:29:57 pm »
Thanks for your take on that story Pudgala2....it makes for nice easy reading  :anjali:


 


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